ethnology

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ethnology

 [eth-nol´o-je]
1. the branch of anthropology that deals with the study of the origin and descent of human races and ethnic groups and their distribution and relationships.
2. the science of comparing and analyzing transcultural differences and similarities and developing theoretical postulations and generalizations from the findings.

eth·nol·o·gy

(eth-nol'ŏ-jē),
The science that compares human culture and/or races; cultural anthropology.

ethnology

/eth·nol·o·gy/ (eth-nol´ah-je) the science dealing with the major cultural groups of humans, their descent, relationship, etc.

ethnology

the study of the distribution, relationships and origins of the races of mankind.
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References in periodicals archive ?
They define the society and its field(s) of research and practice; these are the concerns that mark the common ground of ethnologists and folklorists in all their various denominations and renominations, concerns shared with colleagues from neighboring disciplines who take part in the work and congresses of SIEF.
Still, the ethnologists caution that certain measures must be undertaken to protect the Macedonian national costumes in time.
For example, the abovementioned Victorian-based ethnologist RE Johns was obsessed with Hindu and Confucian texts, and many other ethnologists were attracted to spiritualism and occult traditions.
Others, like ethnologists, were sometimes already familiar with the technique.
At the beginning of the preceding paragraph, "first" has to be in scare quotes because at this rime, ethnologists had also been studying empirical examples of the cultural aspect of play.
In this, another of his signature and wonderfully readable narrative histories (he is also the author of the majestic 1989 Albion's Seed and the Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington's Crossing of 2004), Fischer presents Champlain as a master mariner, explorer, cartographer, ethnologist, courtier, and soldier, but above all as a deeply humane person in a world that was anything but.
In Mali, tere, ethnologist Salia Male explains, denotes "an integral part of the components of every personality, every human's (men and women) state of being, every animal and every plant and object.
The name of British ethnologist Jane Goodall is associated with which African creature?
Scott, who was also a poet of some repute, often collaborated and funded the research of the ethnologist Marius Barbeau.
Although it begins with the story of Deledda's development as a regional writer and ethnologist, which has become almost folkloric itself--her lack of formal education, her reclusive writing, her retiring character--the eleven-page introduction quickly turns its focus to the sordid reception that Deledda's works received.
While a graduate student at UC Berkeley in the 1960s, Applegate spent countless hours in the basement of Dwinelle Hall at UC Berkeley combing through boxes of documents from John Peabody Harrington, a linguist and ethnologist who specialized in the native people of California.
Ethnologist and psychoanalyst Patrick Declerck identifies prevailing attitudes toward the most marginalized urban inhabitants, the homeless, as sado-masochistic.