ethnology

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ethnology

 [eth-nol´o-je]
1. the branch of anthropology that deals with the study of the origin and descent of human races and ethnic groups and their distribution and relationships.
2. the science of comparing and analyzing transcultural differences and similarities and developing theoretical postulations and generalizations from the findings.

eth·nol·o·gy

(eth-nol'ŏ-jē),
The science that compares human culture and/or races; cultural anthropology.

ethnology

/eth·nol·o·gy/ (eth-nol´ah-je) the science dealing with the major cultural groups of humans, their descent, relationship, etc.

ethnology

the study of the distribution, relationships and origins of the races of mankind.
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References in periodicals archive ?
What Cross fails to appreciate is that this mnemonic connection of "site" and "lore," the intertwining of sense of history with sense of place, is ethnologically astute and helps to construct the "inner consistency of reality" that was so important to Tolkien's overall program.
The Catholic Croats and Slovenes were wondering what the outcome of World War II would mean for them; "the aspiration"--the NCWC press release asserted--"of the people of Croatia and the Provinces of Bosnia, Herzegovina, Slavonia, Srem, Dalmatia, Banovina, and Istria-all historically and ethnologically a part of the original Croatia--is a free and sovereign State.
Yet, unlike the more ethnologically minded, the historian finds it difficult to focus on small or neglected groups, however intrinsically interesting their stories or sympathetic their causes, to the neglect or exclusion of larger forces whose influences have set the terms in which the issues of each era are to be played out.
Examples include the Wind River Tribes (comprised of the ethnologically distinct Shoshone and Arapahoe); the Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma; the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma (comprised of the Cherokee, Delaware, Shawnees, and others); and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation.
Lewis' material has been used by them ethnologically to analyse the extent of this connectedness and to give a basis for the claims that similar processes are to be expected throughout prehistory, visibly in the archaeological record and to be taken account of by linguists and human biologists.
A person may not be considered an Indian ethnologically but may qualify for certain programs or services under a federal definition or may qualify for tribal membership under tribal enrollment rules.