ethnography


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ethnography

 [eth-nog´rah-fe]
1. a description of the activities of a group and the beliefs held by group members.
2. study of the lifestyles, beliefs, and norms of a selected group through observation, participation, and analysis. Ethnographic research includes studies of patterns of behavior, known as culture traits, and the relationships between patterns of behavior. Ethnographic inquiry may be on selected topics, such as health and illness, and may ask questions such as “Do fathers in this culture attend the birth of a child?” or “What does a family member do immediately after the birth of a child?”

ethnography

[ethnog′rəfē]
Etymology: Gk, ethnos, nation, graphein, to record
a branch of anthropology that is concerned with the history of nations and ethnic populations.

ethnography

A qualitative research technique which allows the generation of a detailed description of a culture or subculture based on observation, interviews and dialogue, and the genealogical analysis of kinships, descent and marriage using diagrams, symbols and questionnaires.

ethnography

the descriptive study of the races of mankind.
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Although Jackson's text is more a treatment of the question of ethnography than an exhaustive interrogation of the history of the AHIJ it does highlight certain peculiarities.
The use of the term "ethnography" as a general term for empirical research could be misleading for the reader who either expects this book to contain ethnographies or takes this book's contents to define ethnography.
Amid the various inflections of contemporary cultural anthropological writing these days, it seems to me, at least, that the problem of ethnographic thinness or ethnographic refusal (which Sherry Ortner, among several others, pointed out some years ago [1995]) is nowhere near as severe in Melanesianist ethnography as it is in the ethnography of many other world areas.
Part 2, "Ethnography," includes: "Performing as a Moral Act: Ethical Dimensions of the Ethnography of Performance" (65-80); "Rethinking Ethnography: Toward a Critical Cultural Politics" (81-103); "Rethinking Elocution: The Trope of the Talking Book and Other Figures of Speech" (104-26).
By situating ethnography as an important and unique lens by which to understand the cultural dimension of meaning making inherent in interpretation, I argue that there are gaps in our knowledge of interpretive practice.
Clifford claims that ethnography is full of "partial truths" and argues that the age of considering anthropology (and folklore) as a pure social science is past, for "science is in, not above, historical and linguistic processes.
Social science research methods, many of which are part of ethnography, have been incorporated in the DoD Human Terrain System program, as social scientists utilize qualitative field methods to elicit relevant sociocultural information to aid on-the-ground leaders in their tactical and operational decision making.
Towards the Breaking Day is an ethnography of belian, an exceptionally lively tradition of curing rituals performed by the Luangans, a politically marginalized population of swidden cultivators of Indonesian Borneo.
There is also a new chapter on cheese-making, which updates the ethnography of dairy farming in the valley and refers to the author's most recent ethnographic work on local development, typical products, and the reinvention of tradition.
Fischer (1986), and Writing Culture: The Poetics and Politics of Ethnography, edited by James E.
Bouchal uses ethnography to describe the calling nurses have to help their patients live fully while dying.