ethnography


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ethnography

 [eth-nog´rah-fe]
1. a description of the activities of a group and the beliefs held by group members.
2. study of the lifestyles, beliefs, and norms of a selected group through observation, participation, and analysis. Ethnographic research includes studies of patterns of behavior, known as culture traits, and the relationships between patterns of behavior. Ethnographic inquiry may be on selected topics, such as health and illness, and may ask questions such as “Do fathers in this culture attend the birth of a child?” or “What does a family member do immediately after the birth of a child?”

ethnography

[ethnog′rəfē]
Etymology: Gk, ethnos, nation, graphein, to record
a branch of anthropology that is concerned with the history of nations and ethnic populations.

ethnography

A qualitative research technique which allows the generation of a detailed description of a culture or subculture based on observation, interviews and dialogue, and the genealogical analysis of kinships, descent and marriage using diagrams, symbols and questionnaires.

ethnography

the descriptive study of the races of mankind.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
To that end, ethnography provides a means of political engagement as well.
Kullberg reshapes the definition of Martinican literature and its "outside" and "inside" by, for instance, reading Michel Leiris as part of a Martinican corpus and presenting Glissant's Soleil de la conscience as an ethnography of metropolitan France.
Usher's ethnography opens up--in raw and transparent ways--how the combination of journalists' decisions and managerial strategies are shaping a contradictory set of practices that strives for relevance in a hypercompetitive environment.
The ethnography provides ideas for further research and is very easy to work with comparatively.
Although Jackson's text is more a treatment of the question of ethnography than an exhaustive interrogation of the history of the AHIJ it does highlight certain peculiarities.
Institutional ethnography is an alternative sociology.
The use of the term "ethnography" as a general term for empirical research could be misleading for the reader who either expects this book to contain ethnographies or takes this book's contents to define ethnography.
Herrmans' practice-based ethnography of belian is primarily concerned with the latter (though ritual and myth).
Writing Culture: The Poetics and Politics of Ethnography [Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1986]) or Michael Jackson with his dialectical dialogue (as in Michael Jackson, Minima Ethnographica: Intersubjectvity and the Anthropological Project [Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998]).
It is indeed a bit surprising that Mimica doesn't tee off more fully against works that do purport to centrally engage Foucault with Melanesian ethnography.
Dwight Conquergood, Cultural Struggles: Performance, Ethnography, Praxis, edited and with an introduction by E.
A broad spectrum of perspectives and methodologies is presented: Actor-Network-Theory and post-Actor-Network-Theory, performativity theory, ethnography, discourse analysis, Sense-Making Methodology, visual ethnography, multi-sited ethnography, and Social Network Analysis.