ethnography

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ethnography

 [eth-nog´rah-fe]
1. a description of the activities of a group and the beliefs held by group members.
2. study of the lifestyles, beliefs, and norms of a selected group through observation, participation, and analysis. Ethnographic research includes studies of patterns of behavior, known as culture traits, and the relationships between patterns of behavior. Ethnographic inquiry may be on selected topics, such as health and illness, and may ask questions such as “Do fathers in this culture attend the birth of a child?” or “What does a family member do immediately after the birth of a child?”

ethnography

[ethnog′rəfē]
Etymology: Gk, ethnos, nation, graphein, to record
a branch of anthropology that is concerned with the history of nations and ethnic populations.

ethnography

A qualitative research technique which allows the generation of a detailed description of a culture or subculture based on observation, interviews and dialogue, and the genealogical analysis of kinships, descent and marriage using diagrams, symbols and questionnaires.

ethnography

the descriptive study of the races of mankind.
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Certainly their ethnographically thick depictions of Germans in their rural setting are in themselves not enough to differentiate Bahnwarter Thiel and Fasching from their regionally bound predecessors; in particular, the Dorfgeschichte a half-century earlier had already established the literary foregrounding of rustic spaces and their residents.
Its presence only on Ali, Seleo, and Tarawai Islands accords well with the ethnographically documented importance of these island communities as principal middlemen in coastal exchange networks linking other island and coastal villages (Welsch and Terrell 1998).
Laura Appeli-Warren in the Preface to the Diaries also wrote that Monica's "drawings are ethnographically precise.
With the publication of the author's previous book on the pictorial histories of ancient central Mexico, Stories in Red and Black, students of Mesoamerican civilization have anticipated a similarly synthetic, yet ethnographically rich, account of the other major genre from this tradition.
Chapters 4 (Village on Stage), 5 (Global Village), 6 (Village for Hire) and 7 (Back to the Village) provide contemporary ethnographically based interpretations concerned with the concept of the village--a powerful trope in Gorale culture and life.
The archaeological record indicated that Pleistocene societies were less varied than those of the later Holocene and ethnographically documented periods, in other words, Aboriginal societies changed from simple to complex.
Although Aghaie is to be commended for having produced such an important work, by and large, however, The Martyrs of Karbala fails to offer a groundbreaking and theoretically novel historical account of the ceremonies and, in broad terms, to the subfield of Muharram studies that, so far, remains ethnographically underdeveloped and theoretically stagnated.
While the toons played in Euro markets, "Kirikou" is virtually unknown in English-speaking territories and parts of the world where the films' ethnographically correct, bare-breasted African women made kid-friendly distributors nervous.
s has continued to develop) and dealt extensively with the methodological and ethical issues that pertain to ethnographically informed theology.
Cooley's latest book Making Music in the Polish Tatras: Tourists Ethnographers and Mountain Musicians carefully employs an oft-used ethnomusicological model wherein the subjects of music and cultural dynamism guide the ethnomusicologist who offers us a historically and ethnographically dynamic look into the music of a particular region; in Cooley's case, the music of Southern Poland's mountains.
It is ethnographically rich and missiologically significant, for it focuses on indigenous peoples' diverse responses to the introduction of Christianity into their cultures.
This study brings those habits of mind to the forefront and argues that an ethnographically informed approach to preservice teacher education is potentially transformative.