ethnography

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ethnography

 [eth-nog´rah-fe]
1. a description of the activities of a group and the beliefs held by group members.
2. study of the lifestyles, beliefs, and norms of a selected group through observation, participation, and analysis. Ethnographic research includes studies of patterns of behavior, known as culture traits, and the relationships between patterns of behavior. Ethnographic inquiry may be on selected topics, such as health and illness, and may ask questions such as “Do fathers in this culture attend the birth of a child?” or “What does a family member do immediately after the birth of a child?”

ethnography

[ethnog′rəfē]
Etymology: Gk, ethnos, nation, graphein, to record
a branch of anthropology that is concerned with the history of nations and ethnic populations.

ethnography

A qualitative research technique which allows the generation of a detailed description of a culture or subculture based on observation, interviews and dialogue, and the genealogical analysis of kinships, descent and marriage using diagrams, symbols and questionnaires.

ethnography

the descriptive study of the races of mankind.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The third theoretical contribution of this paper aim at clarifying, through an ethnographically documented analysis of the case, the patterns of migration that resulted from the specific social and economical transformations of the researched area in the last two decades.
To read Mumbo Jumbo ethnographically would require us to rethink our ideas of the form and function of folklore and ethnography.
U's debut performance at the Zeebelt was framed ethnographically with attention given to background information concerning Klingon social, cultural, and artistic practices.
Jean-Pierre Esquenazi's "L'interpretation du Film" offers a good example; his previous work has been historically and ethnographically inspired, similar to that of Claire Monk.
Through ethnographically informed interviews and observations conducted with six Black middle and high school girls, Hip Hop's Li'l Sistas Speak explores how young women navigate the space of Hip Hop music and culture to form ideas concerning race, body, class, inequality, and privilege.
of Lisbon, Portugal), this collection is presented as an effort to ethnographically sample experiences of religious pluralism and diversity in different "sites" of southern Europe, including spatial settings such as mosques and churches, spaces and itineraries of religious mobilities, and political arenas of religious contention.
In this volume, Tanya Zivkovic ethnographically documents and analyzes master-disciple relationships in Darjeeling, India over a six-year period (2004-2010).
I am convinced that the Jewish experience, historically and ethnographically, has much to offer broader social theorizing in anthropology in ethnicity, race, religion, gender and language.
Rewarding Alarcon for presenting Peru's recent history ethnographically and pedagogically says more about the awarding institutions that legitimate his work than about the real space it occupies within the greater achievements of Latin American or United States literatures.
It is historically engaged, ethnographically rich, theoretically sophisticated, and clearly born out of a rich personal history within the region.
These are important aspects of social analyses so long as they endure ethnographically, and the status quo seems unlikely to change rapidly now that this language has become entrenched in punters' and industry's perceptions of themselves (Reith 1999; Schull 2012).
Instead, however, he has chosen to write a well-rounded, ethnographically and scientifically grounded examination of the topic that is easily accessible to archaeologists who are not specialists in the study of millstones and milling.