ethnography

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ethnography

 [eth-nog´rah-fe]
1. a description of the activities of a group and the beliefs held by group members.
2. study of the lifestyles, beliefs, and norms of a selected group through observation, participation, and analysis. Ethnographic research includes studies of patterns of behavior, known as culture traits, and the relationships between patterns of behavior. Ethnographic inquiry may be on selected topics, such as health and illness, and may ask questions such as “Do fathers in this culture attend the birth of a child?” or “What does a family member do immediately after the birth of a child?”

ethnography

[ethnog′rəfē]
Etymology: Gk, ethnos, nation, graphein, to record
a branch of anthropology that is concerned with the history of nations and ethnic populations.

ethnography

A qualitative research technique which allows the generation of a detailed description of a culture or subculture based on observation, interviews and dialogue, and the genealogical analysis of kinships, descent and marriage using diagrams, symbols and questionnaires.

ethnography

the descriptive study of the races of mankind.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Although an important part of Baron Pineda's ethnographical data was collected during the early years of the autonomous governments, Shipwrecked Identities nevertheless remains a novel and fascinating analysis of identity formation, social identifi cation, and cultural hierarchies from a historical perspective.
Sigvald Linne was a professor and director of the ethnographical museum in Stockholm, which has fine pre-Columbian collections.
Over several Autumn days in 1895, which were reserved at the exhibition for what was known as the "Moravian Day", representatives of a number of ethnographical areas appeared in Prague and the programme presented the basics of their song and dance repertoire.
Embedded in the theoretical debate between these two theoretical approaches are methodological reflections, which emphasize that ethnographical methods are especially appropriate for researching the social construction of gender.
He actively collected folk songs and ethnographical materials in the Khark iv and the Poltava regions and published extensively, becoming the University's most outstanding graduate and one of the country's most respected scholars.
Accordingly, dowry chests, which had been stored in the Folk Art Museum at the beginning of her research, were all transported to other newly opened ethnographical museums such as Mansion of Dervis Pasa or The House with Eaves (Sacakli Ev).
In the section dealing with the organisation of the caravan trade and the tortuous journey of the muleteers, Hill skilfully incorporates historical documents with data drawn from her own ethnographical field research.
Kim Recalma-Clutesi of the Kwakwa kawkw people of Vancouver Island says the difficulty is unraveling people's belief systems from what they've learned in text, from ethnographical material, and in the recovery centres that often use sweats, smudging and other spiritual practices of the plains people to aid in the healing process.
This collection of short ethnographical essays by Japanese anthropologists is based on research conducted over a two year period from 1995 to 1996.
Francoise Lionnet presents a view similar to mine; for her, Dust Tracks defines "one's subjective ethnicity as mediated through language, history, and ethnographical analysis" (99).
However, Meyer's recent study does not incorporate relevant ethnographical material on La Rochelle or its region.
The problem with relying so heavily on anthropological and ethnographical sources is that readers won't get the same sense of the diversity in Native American lives that they will in Berkin's six chapters on white women.