ethnography

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ethnography

 [eth-nog´rah-fe]
1. a description of the activities of a group and the beliefs held by group members.
2. study of the lifestyles, beliefs, and norms of a selected group through observation, participation, and analysis. Ethnographic research includes studies of patterns of behavior, known as culture traits, and the relationships between patterns of behavior. Ethnographic inquiry may be on selected topics, such as health and illness, and may ask questions such as “Do fathers in this culture attend the birth of a child?” or “What does a family member do immediately after the birth of a child?”

ethnography

[ethnog′rəfē]
Etymology: Gk, ethnos, nation, graphein, to record
a branch of anthropology that is concerned with the history of nations and ethnic populations.

ethnography

A qualitative research technique which allows the generation of a detailed description of a culture or subculture based on observation, interviews and dialogue, and the genealogical analysis of kinships, descent and marriage using diagrams, symbols and questionnaires.

ethnography

the descriptive study of the races of mankind.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Leiris had hoped that the activities proper to the ethnographer would foster better communication with the people amongst whom he was travelling.
In this book, the author explores constructions of ethnicity and music-culture as a direct corollary of the impact of tourists (long attracted to this mountainous region) and ethnographers (similarly attracted to a rich folk culture) in a study drawn from over ten years of research and fieldwork, and built on a dissertation and several published articles.
Ethnography, then, becomes autoethnographic [I would substitute autobiographic here] because the ethnographer is unavoidably in the ethnography one way or another, however subtly or obviously" (158).
As Cooley implies, the essentialisms generated by city-dwelling ethnographers in their definitions of Gorale music prove to be productive for indigenous musical practice itself in that the academic interest in the music legitimizes the peculiarity of Podhale's music.
The French ethnographer puts forward the old comparison rooted in colonialism: 'Certain European cities sink gently into a moribund torpor.
As one ethnographer put it, one day, anthropologists announce their findings, and the following day, their informants in the community go on CNN to explain how the anthropologist got it all wrong about the village.
As it turned out, Eylmann's work was roughly contemporaneous with the Australian work of the much better known zoologist and ethnographer Baldwin Spencer.
Funneled through the strainer of the ethnographer, that experience results in a clear, well documented and researched book that adds significantly to our understanding of the daily realities faced by those who provide services to the mentally ill.
a Clackamas Chinook storyteller whose tales were taken down by white ethnographer Melville Jacobs.
In his 'Epilogue', he considers other work on the theme, from Galen to Ian Hacking and ethnographer, Tanya Luhrmann.
Time and place change swiftly, jumping, for instance, from the cave of a Neanderthal man, where a mysterious sandstone plate with five holes is discovered by a paleontologist, to the encampment of an Eskimo visited by an ethnographer who finds a similar object made from the bone of a seal.
We argue that given the fundamental differences between the ethnographic research strategy and quantitative research approaches, the ethnographer confronts a set of ethical dilemmas that are rather different from those faced by the quantitative researcher.