ethnography

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ethnography

 [eth-nog´rah-fe]
1. a description of the activities of a group and the beliefs held by group members.
2. study of the lifestyles, beliefs, and norms of a selected group through observation, participation, and analysis. Ethnographic research includes studies of patterns of behavior, known as culture traits, and the relationships between patterns of behavior. Ethnographic inquiry may be on selected topics, such as health and illness, and may ask questions such as “Do fathers in this culture attend the birth of a child?” or “What does a family member do immediately after the birth of a child?”

ethnography

[ethnog′rəfē]
Etymology: Gk, ethnos, nation, graphein, to record
a branch of anthropology that is concerned with the history of nations and ethnic populations.

ethnography

A qualitative research technique which allows the generation of a detailed description of a culture or subculture based on observation, interviews and dialogue, and the genealogical analysis of kinships, descent and marriage using diagrams, symbols and questionnaires.

ethnography

the descriptive study of the races of mankind.
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References in periodicals archive ?
This is of course ironic because in the typical ethnographic scenario, it is the ethnographer who takes notes in a field notebook, and also because in a typical ethnographic encounter, the ethnographer is the one who transcribes and summarizes the words of the informant.
Ethnographers of American Jewish life in the 1970s and 1980s continued synchronic work while acknowledging some of the historical dimensions of the people, religion and cultures that they studied.
I utilise explicit examples from my field research to highlight the interplay between the ethnographer and community manager roles.
Even in the context of the Great War, when the ethnic composition of military theatres was a vital strategic concern, professional ethnographers were hard pressed to apply their knowledge and skills to the national cause.
As such, in identifying key themes, choosing and editing representative excerpts, and interspersing analytical commentary with fieldnote examples, ethnographers exercises an authorial privilege that clearly demonstrates that the finished ethnography constitutes their own personal understanding of the social setting.
The book is intended as a guide for 'budding ethnographers as they take on ethnographic projects of their own'.
Having the almost unique advantage of daily access to the ROM's Paul Kane collection," he explains, "I began to compare the sketches and oil paintings in an effort to find Kane the ethnographer and Kane the artist.
Making Music in the Polish Tatras: Tourists, Ethnographers, and Mountain Musicians.
It stands the test of even the most traditional and demanding ethnographers.
If, for instance, an ethnographer observes a participant in a high-risk situation, such as the sharing of injection equipment, or learns of a participant's intent to engage in behavior that would be considered high risk, such as unprotected intercourse with an anonymous sexual partner of unknown HIV serostatus, is there an obligation to intervene?
Relying heavily on his own position as an ethnographer and musician, Timothy J.
At night, with the anthropologist's tape recorder in hand, she became her own ethnographer, inventing informants, interviewing herself, and answering in distinct voices.