ethnocentrism

(redirected from ethnocentricity)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

eth·no·cen·trism

(eth'nō-sen'trizm),
The tendency to evaluate other groups according to the values and standards of one's own ethnic group, especially with the conviction that one's own ethnic group is superior to the other groups.
[G. ethnos, race, tribe, + kentron, center of a circle]

ethnocentrism

[eth′nōsen′trizm]
Etymology: Gk, ethnos, nation, kentron, center
1 a belief in the inherent superiority of the "race" or group to which one belongs.
2 a proclivity to consider other ethnic groups in terms of one's own racial origins.

eth·no·cen·trism

(eth'nō-sen'trizm)
The tendency to evaluate other groups according to the values and standards of one's own ethnic group, especially with the conviction that one's own ethnic group is superior to other groups.
[G. ethnos, race, tribe, + kentron, center of a circle]

eth·no·cen·trism

(eth'nō-sen'trizm)
Tendency to evaluate other ethnic groups according to values and standards of one's own, especially with conviction that one's own is superior to others.
[G. ethnos, race, tribe, + kentron, center of a circle]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
As William Richter and Frances Burke relate; "When government operates in secret, the ability of the public to hold the government accountable is imperiled," (Richter and Burke 2007) and likewise, when individuals who are civically engaged in a civil society are projecting their personal moral sentiments into an issue without those personal feelings being able to be assessed as to there right or wrongness, civil society can be said to be placed at risk by those who express the various forms of egoism, self-interest and altruism of ethnocentricity.
There is no room for ethnocentricity on the part of health care providers.
Lawrence Hogue asserts in an article on the postmodern jazz aesthetic that motivates the work of Reed, Morrison, and Clarence Major, Reed's literary sensibilities carefully amalgamate the world of jazz (structure, language, content, and so on) with hoodoo culture and practices as a way to countermand a modernist ethnocentricity that casts African Americans as perpetually object, Other, and/or periphery (169-70).
Critique 2 focuses on the issue of ethnocentricity in strategy research.
2) The agency's director had suggested the need to promote women by imposing hiring quotas on implementing partners, a decision that elicited disguised derision from the agency's own Rwandan female employees precisely because of its ethnocentricity.
Expatriates also need to overcome the traditional American ethnocentricity and understand that each code is different from their own.
Laves, on the other hand--as is evident from various parts of his papers--was anti-communist, anti-worker and pro-American capitalism as well as possessing a certain ethnocentricity about America vis-a-vis Australia.
The moment the Soviet Union fell, the world plunged into ethnocentricity," says George Ortiz, a celebrated collector of classical and Middle Eastern antiquities.
A study of metaphorical kinship helps to explain how Paul's gospel transcended ethnocentricity and embraced all nations as potential children of God.
The Register-Guard has documented that the naming process has been riddled with ethnocentricity and disrespect for cultural differences.
108) Likewise, scholars who have appreciated how "Shakespeare fused a number of disparate elements together to form an admirably balanced unity" seem doomed to snipe that "some post-Kottian" critics, "trying to appropriate [Dream] for politico-social ideology," upset this balance by publishing criticism that "exemplifies all the vices of misdescription," including "incompleteness, ahistoricity, suppression, exaggeration, and ethnocentricity.