labyrinth

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labyrinth

 [lab´ĭ-rinth]
the inner ear, consisting of the vestibule, cochlea, and semicircular canals. The cochlea is concerned with hearing and the vestibule and semicircular canals with the sense of equilibrium. (See also color plates.) adj., adj labyrin´thine. 

The bony portion of the labyrinth (osseous labyrinth) is composed of a series of canals tunneled out of the temporal bone. Inside the osseous labyrinth is the membranous labyrinth, which conforms to the general shape of the osseous labyrinth but is much smaller. A fluid called perilymph fills the space (perilymphatic space) between the osseous and membranous labyrinths. Fluid inside the membranous labyrinth is called endolymph. These fluids play an important role in the transmission of sound waves and the maintenance of body balance. The membranous labyrinth is divided into two parts: the cochlear labyrinth, which includes the perilymphatic space and the cochlear duct, and the vestibular labyrinth, which includes the utricle, saccule, and semicircular canals.

Disorders of the inner ear, such as labyrinthitis and meniere's disease, are characterized by episodes of dizziness, tinnitus, and hearing loss.
ethmoid labyrinth (ethmoidal labyrinth) either of the paired lateral masses of the ethmoid bone, consisting of numerous thin-walled cellular cavities, the ethmoidal cells.

lab·y·rinth

(lab'i-rinth), [TA] Any of several anatomic structures with numerous intercommunicating cells or canals.
1. The internal or inner ear, composed of the semicircular ducts, vestibule, and cochlea.
2. Any group of communicating cavities, as in each lateral mass of the ethmoid bone.
3. A group of upright test tubes terminating below in a base of communicating, alternately ⊔-shaped and ⊓-shaped tubes, used for isolating motile from nonmotile organisms in culture, or a motile from a less motile organism (as the typhoid from the colon bacillus), the former traveling faster and farther through the tubes than the latter.

labyrinth

/lab·y·rinth/ (lab´ĭ-rinth) the internal ear, made up of the vestibule, cochlea, and canals. labyrin´thine
Enlarge picture
Labyrinth. (A), Anterior view of the bony labyrinth (labyrinthus osseus). (B), Posterior view of the membranous labyrinth (labyrinthus membranaceus), which is contained within the bony labyrinth.

bony labyrinth  the bony part of the internal ear.
Enlarge picture
Labyrinth. (A), Anterior view of the bony labyrinth (labyrinthus osseus). (B), Posterior view of the membranous labyrinth (labyrinthus membranaceus), which is contained within the bony labyrinth.
cochlear labyrinth  the part of the membranous labyrinth that includes the perilymphatic space and the cochlear duct.
endolymphatic labyrinth  membranous l.
ethmoidal labyrinth  either of the paired lateral masses of the ethmoid bone, which contain many thin-walled cellular cavities.
membranous labyrinth  a system of communicating epithelial sacs and ducts within the bony labyrinth, containing the endolymph.
Enlarge picture
Labyrinth. (A), Anterior view of the bony labyrinth (labyrinthus osseus). (B), Posterior view of the membranous labyrinth (labyrinthus membranaceus), which is contained within the bony labyrinth.
osseous labyrinth  bony l.
perilymphatic labyrinth  perilymphatic space.
vestibular labyrinth  the part of the membranous labyrinth that includes the utricle and saccule and the semicircular ducts.

labyrinth

(lăb′ə-rĭnth′)
n.
1.
a. An intricate structure of interconnecting passages through which it is difficult to find one's way; a maze.
b. Labyrinth Greek Mythology The maze in which the Minotaur was confined.
2. A design consisting of a single unbranching but highly convoluted path leading from the outside to the center of a usually circular or square space.
3. Something highly intricate or convoluted in character, composition, or construction: a labyrinth of rules and regulations.
4. Anatomy
a. A group of complex interconnecting anatomical cavities.
b. See inner ear.

labyrinth

lab·y·rinth

(labi-rinth) [TA]
1. The internal or inner ear, composed of the semicircular ducts, vestibule, and cochlea.
2. Any group of communicating cavities, as in each lateral mass of the ethmoid bone.
3. A group of communicating culture tubes used for separating motile from nonmotile microorganisms.

labyrinth

Any group of communicating anatomical cavities, especially the internal ear, comprizing the vestibule, semicircular canals and the cochlea.

Labyrinth

The bony cavity of the inner ear.
Mentioned in: Labyrinthitis

lab·y·rinth

(labi-rinth) [TA]
Internal or inner ear, composed of the semicircular ducts, vestibule, and cochlea.

labyrinth

the system of interconnecting cavities or canals of the internal ear, consisting of the vestibule, cochlea and semicircular canals.
The cochlea is concerned with hearing, and the vestibule and semicircular canals with equilibrium (sense of balance).

bony labyrinth
the bony or osseous labyrinth is composed of a series of canals tunneled out of the temporal bone.
ethmoid labyrinth, ethmoidal labyrinth
either of the paired lateral masses of the ethmoid bone, consisting of numerous thin-walled cellular cavities, the ethmoidal cells.
membranous labyrinth
inside the osseous labyrinth is the membranous labyrinth, which conforms to the general shape of the osseous labyrinth but is smaller. A fluid called perilymph fills the space between the osseous and membranous labyrinths. Fluid inside the membranous labyrinth is called endolymph. These fluids play an important role in the transmission of sound waves and the maintenance of body balance.
osseous labyrinth
a complex excavation in the petrous part of the temporal bone which houses the membranous labyrinth.