ethicist

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ethicist

 [eth´ĭ-sist]
in health care, a person with graduate education, preferably doctoral, who is expert in bioethics and has broad knowledge in philosophy and medicine or nursing, and whose job it is to help sort through difficult clinical situations to find ethical solutions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many ethicians continue simply to describe ethical codes and systems, but rapid globalization has forced the recognition that normative ethics, too, needs to be developed--albeit in ways that start by searching for common ground recognized by people of all cultures.
His contention that messianism makes Jewish and Christian ethics quite distinct (especially his application of this thesis to the bishops' Pastoral on the Economy) deserves a stiff challenge, but overall this an important and well-written volume that deserves serious attention from Christian ethicians.
15) He only hints at the massive contribution of Protestant social ethicians, such as the Niebuhr brothers, Tillich, and Barth, who employed "the Protestant principle" as a creative critique of society, and he locates the flaw in our cultural code within the American Protestant tradition.
The essential task that remains is a deeper investigation of the breath-taking open-endedness of Jesus' radical altruism that so confounds the rational procedures of ethicians.
Virtue ethicians have forcefully underlined freedom's role in the formation of character: we do not merely choose objects, but we make ourselves certain kinds of people.
During the past years some Protestant ethicians have found an ethics of virtue attractive.
For virtue ethicians, the liberal commitment to justice ignores the constitutive role tradition and conceptions of the good have in any account of the justification of moral norms.
While the book is entitled Corrective Vision, another possible title (suggested by the essay on abortion) might be Exploring the Middle Ground, as McCormick consistently seeks to avoid the extremes which characterize many of the more polemical ethicians of both the right and the left.
A wide variety of moral theologians will find in this book strong and compelling theoretical support for their projects: feminist ethicians, theologians interested in the role of emotion in moral decision making, people engaged in interreligious dialogue, or even those on the Continent who are working to retrieve the virtue of epikeia.