ethereal

(redirected from etherial)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

ethereal

 [e-the´re-al]
1. pertaining to, prepared with, containing, or resembling ether.
2. evanescent; delicate.

e·the·re·al

(ē-thēr'ē-ăl),
1. Relating to or containing ether.
2. Dissolved in an ether.
[G. aitherios, etherial, fr. aithēr, the upper air]

ethereal

/ethe·re·al/ (ĕ-thēr´e-il)
1. pertaining to, prepared with, containing, or resembling ether.
2. evanescent; delicate.

ethereal

[ithir′ē·əl]
Etymology: Gk, aither, air
pertaining to or resembling ether.

e·the·re·al

(ĕ-thēr'ē-ăl)
Relating to or containing ether.
[G. aitherios, etherial, fr. aithēr, the upper air]

ethereal

1. pertaining to, prepared with, containing or resembling ether.
2. evanescent; delicate.

ethereal sulfates
an important detoxication process in the liver is the formation of these sulfates that are more readily excreted than the parent compounds.
References in periodicals archive ?
B: [tenor is silent during this line] / Thro' the etherial skies /
The Johnsons' bedroom is an etherial retreat of blue and white.
We say: I don't know why all the yoga apps have to feature such spaced-out etherial voices, but all of them do.
The cover of the 1 July 1847 issue of Aaron's journal illustrates the lengths to which he was prepared to go to try to put 'The etherial humbug' in its place.
30) Blake evidently thought Phillips would see the connection between anti-Newtonianism and scoffing at the stars' "influence"--a word that Blake uses in his writings eight times (31) in the sense of "the supposed flowing or streaming from the stars or heavens of an etherial fluid acting upon the character and destiny of men" (OED).
Annibale's tiny Coronation of St Stephen (Weiner Collection, New York) is a cerulean hymn of praise, as etherial as the miniatures by Elsheimer nearby.
3) Ultimately, mercantile culture fails as a metaphor for Woolf because it already carries with it the early symptoms of the modern disease: its exotic-sounding consumer products - such as silk and oil - did not imply any transcendent value; its heroes (pirates) were not really searching for God; its poets, as much as they spoke of an etherial absolute, wrote for a crowded, democratized, unwashed populace; its heavenly paeans to its Virgin Queen only immortalized a woman (and not necessarily a virgin woman).
The wedding party and guests entered through an aisle which had an etherial feel--lined with antique gold lanterns and greenery, facing an open stone fireplace, decorated with eucalyptus garland, flowers, and candles.
Roger McGuinn's transcendental 12 string guitar and etherial vocals were among the most distinctive trademarks of mid 1960s popular music.
As Reiman and Fraistat astutely remark, the opening section "displays PBS's diction, tone and perspective that continually enlist the denotations and connotations of words and the mellifluous quality of their sounds to transform solid physical objects into transient, etherial states of moral significance" (210).