ethacrynic acid


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

ethacrynic acid

 [eth″ah-krin´ik]
a loop diuretic used orally in the treatment of edema, including that associated with congestive heart failure or hepatic or renal disease, ascites, and hypertension.

eth·a·cryn·ic ac·id

(eth'ă-krin'ik as'id),
An unsaturated ketone derivative of aryloxyacetic acid; a potent loop diuretic and a weak antihypertensive;

ethacrynic acid

/eth·a·cryn·ic ac·id/ (eth-ah-krin´ik) a loop diuretic used in the treatment of edema, including that associated with congestive heart failure or hepatic or renal disease, ascites, and hypertension.

ethacrynic acid

(ĕth′ə-krĭn′ĭk)
n.
A compound, C13H12Cl2O4, used as a diuretic primarily to treat severe edema.

ethacrynic acid

[eth′əkrin′ik]
a loop diuretic.
indications It is prescribed as a treatment for severe edema, such as nephrotic syndrome, hepatic cirrhoses, and ascites of malignancy. Unlike many other diuretics, ethacrynic acid is not a sulfonamide derivative and can therefore be tolerated by some people who develop hypersensitivity reactions to other diuretics.
contraindications Pregnancy, anuria, or known hypersensitivity to this drug prohibits its use. It is not given to infants.
adverse effects Among the more serious adverse effects are tetany, muscle weakness, cramps, and excessive diuresis. Hearing loss may occur.

ethacrynic acid

Etacrynic acid, a LOOP DIURETIC drug. A drug that acts on the tubules in the kidneys to interfere with the reabsorption of water and thus greatly increase the output of urine. A brand name is Edecrin.

eth·a·cryn·ic ac·id

(eth'ă-krin'ik as'id)
Unsaturated ketone derivative of aryloxyacetic acid; a potent loop diuretic and a weak antihypertensive;
References in periodicals archive ?
In the absence of experimentally validated protocols, for now, clinicians should simply keep ethacrynic acid in mind as a final diuretic to be tried before either giving up or resorting to invasive interventions.
Ethacrynic acid is little used today because of ototoxicity, but this concern must be balanced against the immediate clinical acuity if other diuretics prove ineffective.
Two patients with life-threatening congestive heart failure unresponsive to furosemide were successfully treated with intravenous ethacrynic acid.
A third patient with ascites and a pleural effusion secondary to liver cirrhosis had minimal urine output from high doses of spironolactone and furosemide but diuresed more than 5 L urine in 2 days with ethacrynic acid.
Clinicians should be aware of ethacrynic acid as part of the available armamentarium for treating congestive heart failure and liver cirrhosis.
Efficacy of ethacrynic acid in patients with refractory congestive heart failure resistant to meralluride.
The use of ethacrynic acid in patients with cirrhosis and ascites.
Rapid development of glutathione-S-transferase-dependent drug resistance in vitro and its prevention by ethacrynic acid.
IV ethacrynic acid was administered at 50 mg, restoring urine output and improving oxygen saturation to 92% on the nonbreather mask 2 hours after the infusion.
The patient was maintained in a state of nonoliguric renal failure and transferred out of intensive care on postoperative Day 7, receiving oral ethacrynic acid 25 mg daily.
On the other hand, Jampel points out that the researchers injected ethacrynic acid directly into the eye - a mode of administration that would surely dampen the drug's popularity with patients.
The experiments with ethacrynic acid raise more than a glimmer of hope for millions of people with primary open-angle glaucoma.