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triangle

 [tri´ang-g'l]
a three-cornered object, figure, or area, such as a delineated area on the surface of the body; called also trigone.
carotid triangle, inferior that between the median line of the neck in front, the sternocleidomastoid muscle, and the anterior belly of the omohyoid muscle.
carotid triangle, superior carotid trigone.
cephalic triangle one on the anteroposterior plane of the skull, between lines from the occiput to the forehead and to the chin, and from the chin to the forehead.
digastric triangle submandibular triangle.
Einthoven's triangle an imaginary equilateral triangle with the heart at its center, formed by the axes of the three bipolar limb leads.
Einthoven's triangle. Bipolar limb leads I, II, and III form Einthoven's triangle. Other standard positions for electrocardiographic leads are the augmented unipolar leads: aVR (right arm), aVL (left arm), and aVF (left leg). From Polaski and Tatro, 1996.
triangle of elbow a triangular area on the front of the elbow, bounded by the brachioradial muscle on the outside and the round pronator muscle inside, with the base toward the humerus.
triangle of election superior carotid triangle.
facial triangle a triangular area whose points are the basion and the alveolar and nasal points.
femoral triangle the area formed superiorly by the inguinal ligament, laterally by the sartorius muscle, and medially by the adductor longus muscle; called also Scarpa's triangle.
infraclavicular triangle that formed by the clavicle above, the upper border of the greater pectoral muscle on the inside, and the anterior border of the deltoid muscle on the outside.
inguinal triangle the triangular area bounded by the inner edge of the sartorius muscle, the inguinal ligament, and the outer edge of the long adductor muscle.
lumbocostoabdominal triangle that lying between the external oblique muscle of the abdomen, the posterior inferior serratus muscle, the erector muscle of the spine, and the internal oblique muscle of the abdomen.
occipital triangle the area bounded by the sternocleidomastoid muscle in front, the trapezius muscle behind, and the omohyoid muscle below.
Scarpa's triangle femoral triangle.
subclavian triangle a triangular area bounded by the clavicle, the sternocleidomastoid muscle, and the omohyoid muscle.
suboccipital triangle that lying between the posterior greater rectus muscle of the head and the superior and inferior oblique muscles of the head.

tri·an·gle

(trī'ang-gĕl), [TA]
In anatomy and surgery, a three-sided area with arbitrary or natural boundaries.
See also: trigonum, region.
[L. triangulum, fr. tri-, three, + angulus, angle]

triangle

/tri·an·gle/ (tri´ang-g'l) trigone; a three-cornered figure or area, such as on the surface of the body.
anal triangle  the portion of the perineal region surrounding the anus.
carotid triangle, inferior  the part of the carotid trigone medial to the omohyoid muscle.
carotid triangle, superior  carotid trigone.
cephalic triangle  one on the anteroposterior plane of skull, between lines from the occiput to the forehead and to the chin, and from the chin to the forehead.
Codman's triangle  a triangular area visible radiographically where the periosteum, elevated by a bone tumor, rejoins the cortex of normal bone.
digastric triangle  submandibular t.
triangle of elbow  in front, the supinator longus on the outside and pronator teres inside, the base toward the humerus.
facial triangle  a triangle whose points are the basion, and alveolar and nasal points.
Farabeuf's triangle  one in the upper part of the neck bound by the internal jugular vein, the facial nerve, and the hypoglossal nerve.
femoral triangle 
1. the area formed superiorly by the inguinal ligament, laterally by the sartorius muscle, and medially by the adductor longus muscle.
2. the surface area of the thigh overlying this area.
frontal triangle  one bounded by the maximum frontal diameter and the lines to the glabella.
Hesselbach's triangle  inguinal t. (1).
iliofemoral triangle  one formed by Nélaton's line, another line through the superior iliac spine, and a third from this to the greater trochanter.
infraclavicular triangle  one formed by the clavicle above, upper border of the pectoralis major on the inside, and the anterior border of the deltoid on the outside.
inguinal triangle 
1. the area on the inferoanterior abdominal wall bounded by the rectus abdominis muscle, the inguinal ligament, and inferior epigastric vessels.
2. femoral t. (1).
triangle of Koch  a roughly triangular area on the septal wall of the right atrium, between the tricuspid valve, coronary sinus orifice, and tendon of Todaro, that marks the site of the atrioventricular node.
Enlarge picture
Triangle of Koch, at the apex of which lies the atrioventricular node.
Langenbeck's triangle  one whose apex is the anterior superior iliac spine, its base the anatomic neck of the femur, and its external side the external base of the greater trochanter.
Lesser's triangle  one formed by the hypoglossal nerve above, and the two bellies of the digastricus on the two sides.
lumbar triangle  Petit's t.
lumbocostoabdominal triangle  one between the obliquus externus, the serratus posterior inferior, the erector spinae, and the obliquus internus.
Macewen's triangle  mastoid fossa.
occipital triangle  one having the sternomastoid in front, the trapezius behind, and the omohyoid below.
occipital triangle, inferior  one having a line between the two mastoid processes as its base and the inion its apex.
omoclavicular triangle  subclavian t.
Pawlik's triangle  an area on the anterior vaginal wall corresponding to the trigone of the bladder.
Petit's triangle  the inferolateral margin of the latissimus dorsi and the external oblique muscle of the abdomen.
Scarpa's triangle  femoral t. (1).
subclavian triangle  a deep region of the neck: the triangular area bounded by the clavicle, sternocleidomastoid, and omohyoid.
submandibular triangle , submaxillary triangle the triangular region of the neck bounded by the mandible, the stylohyoid muscle and posterior belly of the digastric muscle, and the anterior belly of the digastric muscle.
suboccipital triangle  one between the rectus capitis posterior major and superior and inferior oblique muscles.
supraclavicular triangle  subclavian t.
suprameatal triangle  mastoid fossa.

triangle

Etymology: L, triangulus, three-cornered
a predictable emotional process that takes place when there is difficulty in a relationship. Triangles represent dysfunctional efforts to reduce fusion or conflict in a relationship. The three corners of a triangle can be composed of three people or two people and an object, group, or issue.

tri·an·gle

(trī'ang-gĕl) [TA]
anatomy, surgery A three-sided area with arbitrary or natural boundaries.
See also: trigonum, region
[L. triangulum, fr. tri-, three, + angulus, angle]

tri·an·gle

(trī'ang-gĕl) [TA]
In anatomy and surgery, three-sided area with arbitrary or natural boundaries.
[L. triangulum, fr. tri-, three, + angulus, angle]

triangle,

n a three-cornered area.
triangle, anterior cervical,
n one of two major triangles delineated by the sternocleidomastoid muscles, it extends approximately from the inferior part of the neck to the mandible.
triangle, Bolton,
n.pr a triangle formed by drawing a line from the nasion to the sella turcica and from there to the Bolton point.
triangle, Bonwill,
n.pr an equilateral triangle with 4-inch (10-cm) sides bounded by lines from the contact points of the mandibular central incisors (or the median line of the residual ridge of the mandible) to the condyle on either side and from one condyle to the other. It is the basis for Bonwill's theory of occlusion.
triangle, carotid,
n also called the superior carotid triangle. The region of the neck bounded by the posterior belly of digastric muscle, the superior belly of the omohyoid muscle, and the anterior border of sternomastoid muscle. The carotid triangle contains numerous veins, arteries, and nerves.
triangle, cervical, posterior,
n a region of the neck containing numerous vein, artery, and lymph node structures.
triangle, hyoid,
n an area consisting of the hyoid bone and its ligaments, located in front of the throat above the Adam's apple. The presence of a raised, or positive, hyoid triangle is indicative of neck or jaw injury.
triangle, submandibular,
n a region in the neck bounded by the mandible and the anterior and posterior bellies of the digastric muscle; contains the submandibular gland. Also known as the
digastric triangle or the
submaxillary triangle.
triangle, submental,
n a region in the neck bounded by the anterior belly of the gastric muscle, the midline of the neck, and the hyoid bone. Its floor is the mylohyoid muscle, and it contains the submental lymph nodes, the anterior jugular vein, and the submental artery.
triangle, Tweed,
n.pr a triangle formed by the mandibular plane, Frankfort plane, and long axis of the mandibular central incisor. Proposed as a diagnostic aid by C.H. Tweed.

triangle

a three-cornered object, figure or area, as such an area on the surface of the body capable of fairly precise definition. Called also trigone.

facial triangle
a triangular area whose points are the basion and the alveolar and nasal points.
femoral triangle
the triangle bounded cranially by the sartorius, caudally by the pectineus and deeply by the iliopsoas muscles in the dog. The pulse of the femoral artery can be taken at this site.
vesical triangle
the area of the bladder wall within the triangle demarcated by the ureteral and urethral orifices. The bladder mucosa is firmly attached at this point and does not form folds.
Viborg's triangle
a surgical site on the side of the throat of the horse bounded by the caudal border of the mandible, the linguofacial vein and the tendon of the sternocephalic muscle.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is an unusual example of the eternal triangle, with a coach asking for the release of a captain who is willing to tour, but the chairman is refusing to listen to the coach.
She said: "The title is a play on chess and it's really about an eternal triangle - who gets the queen?
THE QUIET AMERICAN CERT 15, 100 MINS Published in 1955, Graham Greene's novel unfolded an eternal triangle set in Saigon involving a jaded, opium addicted British journalist, an apparently idealistic American and the Vietnamese girl they both loved.
Butcher's daughter Claire - a Brookie regular for two and a bit years - has already been bombarded with advice from the soap's fans on which way she should turn in the eternal triangle.
This was a contemporary variation on the eternal triangle, involving two female former university friends and the boyfriend of one of them.
The action is set in that familiar device, the eternal triangle.
An eternal triangle in which Cusack, dowdy neurotic vet wife (Cameron Diaz) and his bisexual bitch business partner (Oscar nominee Catherine Keener) have sex with each other using Malkovich's body.
The unlikely eternal triangle - Jack (Bill Tarmey) reckons Alec (Roy Barraclough) has been trying to seduce Vera (Liz Dawn) while he's been hospitalised - was a hoot.