estuary-associated syndrome

estuary-associated syndrome

symptom constellation attributed to Pfeisteria piscicida exposure. CDC criteria require symptoms within 2 weeks of exposure to estuarine waters; memory loss or confusion; and/or three or more selected symptoms (for example, headache, rash at water contact site, sensation of burning skin, URI symptoms, muscle cramps, and GI symptoms) that must (except for skin complaints) persist at least 2 weeks; absence of other more likely etiologies.
References in periodicals archive ?
Each of the patients met the criteria for chronic possible estuary-associated syndrome (PEAS) following differential diagnosis, and responded positively to cholestyramine therapy.
Human visual function in the North Carolina Clinical Study on possible estuary-associated syndrome.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Notice to readers: possible estuary-associated syndrome.
Diagnosis of possible estuary-associated syndrome (PEAS) is largely subjective at present.
Environmental public health surveillance: possible estuary-associated syndrome.
Is there an estuary-associated syndrome in North Carolina?
Her previous letter concerned our first EHP article (Shoemaker and Hudnell 2001) on possible estuary-associated syndrome (PEAS).
In "Possible Estuary-Associated Syndrome: Symptoms, Vision, and Treatment," Shoemaker and Hudnell (1) advocated use of the visual contrast sensitivity (VCS) test as a biomarker to diagnose possible estuary-associated syndrome (PEAS) and to assess response to their proposed treatment regimen.
15) reported that only these six cases with actual exposure met the CDC criteria for estuary-associated syndrome, and that four had neuropsychologic impairment.
cholestyramine, chronic neurotoxic illness, harmful algal blooms, Pfiesteria, possible estuary-associated syndrome, visual contrast sensitivity.
In their study, the North Carolina team used the 1997 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention case description for estuary-associated syndrome (EAS).
EPA) and the National Institute for Occupational Health and Safety (NIOSH), formulated a case description for estuary-associated syndrome (EAS) (20).

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