tarragon

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tarragon

Herbal medicine
A perennial herb that contains essential oils and used primarily as a seasoning. Tarragon was formerly used as a diuretic, appetite stimulant, and emmenagogue; it is little used by modern herbologists.
 
Toxicity
Tarragon’s oil may be carcinogenic.
References in periodicals archive ?
But Vladimir and Estragon, like all human beings, exist in other sets of circles: living organisms subject to the cycles of time, on a round planet, orbiting the sun.
The set design was splendidly original and imaginative and the costumes were excellent and adhered to what has become the expected turnouts for this particular play and perfectly suit Estragon and Vladimir as two likeable itinerants with no back story.
When asked by Vladimir how come that he doesn't recognize the place where they spent so much time together, Estragon answers furiously:
Aunque la obra carece de intriga, las acciones (3) irrisorias de Vladimir y Estragon muestran sus diferencias de pensamiento y de concepcion del mundo.
The play revolves around Vladimir (Ali Junejo) and Estragon (Faris Khalid), aka Didi and Gogo, who wait in the middle of nowhere day after day for Godot to show up but he never does.
If Stewart's sensible Vladimir is the rational adult in this existential vaudeville act, McKellen's endearingly goofy Estragon is the irrational child who obeys his natural instincts and acts spontaneously.
Estragon and Vladimir are part of the Windrush generation, who came to Britain in the 1950s with high hopes.
Vladimir and Estragon continue to struggle and be defiant towards an absurd world (via Camus), not only because of their temperaments and dispositions, but because Vladimir, "broods, musing on the struggle" (2).
As linhas se referem ao momento em que Vladimir e Estragon planejam o proprio suicidio.
Next to Lucky's entry the word "tied" appears (15), and in the review we read that Vladimir and Estragon "wonder whether in some way they are 'tied' to Godot" (444).
Waiting for Godot is an absurdist play by Samuel Beckett, in which Vladimir and Estragon wait endlessly and in vain for Godot to arrive.