estimate

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estimate

 [es´tĭ-ma]
1. a rough calculation or one based on incomplete data.
2. a statistic used to characterize the value of a population parameter. Called also estimator.
3. (es´tĭ-māt) to produce or use such a calculation or statistic.

es·ti·mate

(es'tĭ-māt),
1. A measurement or a statement about the value of some quantity that is known, believed, or suspected to incorporate some degree of error.
2. The result of applying any estimator to a random sample of data. It is not a random variable but a realization of one, a fixed quantity, and it has no variance although commonly it also furnishes an estimate of what the variance of the estimator is. (Not to be confused with an estimator, which is a prescription for obtaining an estimate.)
[L. aestimo, pp. aestimatum, to appraise]

estimate

/es·ti·mate/
1. (es´tĭ-mat) a rough calculation or one based on incomplete data.
2. (es´tĭ-mat) a statistic used to characterize the value of a population parameter.
3. (es´tĭ-māt) to produce or use such a calculation or statistic.

estimate

A popular term for an educated guess about a thing or process. See Cookie cutter estimate, Demand-based estimate, Objective probability estimate, Subjective probability estimate.

es·ti·mate

(es'ti-măt)
1. A measurement or a statement about the value of some quantity that is known, believed, or suspected to incorporate some degree of error.
2. The result of applying any estimator to a random sample of data. It is not a random variable but a realization of one, a fixed quantity, and it has no variance although commonly it also furnishes an estimate of what the variance of the estimator is. usage note Not to be confused with an estimator, which is a prescription for obtaining an estimate.
[L. aestimo, pp. aestimatum, to appraise]

es·ti·mate

(es'ti-măt)
1. A measurement or a statement about the value of some quantity that is known, believed, or suspected to incorporate some degree of error.
2. The result of applying any estimator to a random sample of data.
[L. aestimo, pp. aestimatum, to appraise]

estimate,

n the anticipated fee for dental services to be performed.

estimate

a measurement which is believed likely to incorporate a degree of error.

Patient discussion about estimate

Q. Hi friends, I like to estimate my body fat based on my height and weight. Hi friends, I like to estimate my body fat based on my height and weight. When I enquired about this I heard about BMI. Though I understood little about it I want to know more about what is BMI and why is it useful?

A. the BMI is not a very good method...it only helps if you are an average person. you can gain weight if you start training and still get in shape and loose fat. but it is our only cheap method...there are gyms that hold a way of measuring body fat- maybe try going to one of those?

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References in periodicals archive ?
com ) incorporates the student's estimative reports, a link-analysis chart of the command structure of the North Caucasus insurgency, as well as individual assessments for Chechnya, Dagestan, Ingushetia, and Kabardino-Balkaria.
Financial planning had its beginning in the last decade of the 50s in the United States; represented by the budget, based in estimative of derived expenses of the revenues forecast.
Intelligence analysts, though, use estimative processes to create some analyses, thus "artificially creat[ing] the future through the selection of starting assumptions and scenario creation.
As far as specific aspects of analysis are concerned, and linked to the concept of estimative intelligence, the following is important: (23)
In October 1965, the Joint Intelligence Committee (the United Kingdom's highest estimative body) advised the political leadership that even a full trade embargo would "not in itself [have] crippling effects on the Rhodesia economy.
2011) due to low standard-error of estimative in predict the AMEn values of feedstuffs for broilers: AMEn (energy feedstuffs) = 4,205.
The global and estimative analysis of type B experiment is presented in the graphics from figure 3.
The apprehension of the end only by the interior sense is proper to irrational animals operating through their natural estimative power.
Methodologies]); SEE: standard error of estimative (degrees-day); ([R.
As will be shown, the mind includes certain capacities, such as the estimative capacity, that are distinct from the intellective capacity to understand universal concepts.