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estimate

 [es´tĭ-ma]
1. a rough calculation or one based on incomplete data.
2. a statistic used to characterize the value of a population parameter. Called also estimator.
3. (es´tĭ-māt) to produce or use such a calculation or statistic.

es·ti·mate

(es'tĭ-māt),
1. A measurement or a statement about the value of some quantity that is known, believed, or suspected to incorporate some degree of error.
2. The result of applying any estimator to a random sample of data. It is not a random variable but a realization of one, a fixed quantity, and it has no variance although commonly it also furnishes an estimate of what the variance of the estimator is. (Not to be confused with an estimator, which is a prescription for obtaining an estimate.)
[L. aestimo, pp. aestimatum, to appraise]

estimate

/es·ti·mate/
1. (es´tĭ-mat) a rough calculation or one based on incomplete data.
2. (es´tĭ-mat) a statistic used to characterize the value of a population parameter.
3. (es´tĭ-māt) to produce or use such a calculation or statistic.

estimate

A popular term for an educated guess about a thing or process. See Cookie cutter estimate, Demand-based estimate, Objective probability estimate, Subjective probability estimate.

es·ti·mate

(es'ti-măt)
1. A measurement or a statement about the value of some quantity that is known, believed, or suspected to incorporate some degree of error.
2. The result of applying any estimator to a random sample of data. It is not a random variable but a realization of one, a fixed quantity, and it has no variance although commonly it also furnishes an estimate of what the variance of the estimator is. usage note Not to be confused with an estimator, which is a prescription for obtaining an estimate.
[L. aestimo, pp. aestimatum, to appraise]

es·ti·mate

(es'ti-măt)
1. A measurement or a statement about the value of some quantity that is known, believed, or suspected to incorporate some degree of error.
2. The result of applying any estimator to a random sample of data.
[L. aestimo, pp. aestimatum, to appraise]

estimate,

n the anticipated fee for dental services to be performed.

estimate

a measurement which is believed likely to incorporate a degree of error.

Patient discussion about estimate

Q. Hi friends, I like to estimate my body fat based on my height and weight. Hi friends, I like to estimate my body fat based on my height and weight. When I enquired about this I heard about BMI. Though I understood little about it I want to know more about what is BMI and why is it useful?

A. the BMI is not a very good method...it only helps if you are an average person. you can gain weight if you start training and still get in shape and loose fat. but it is our only cheap method...there are gyms that hold a way of measuring body fat- maybe try going to one of those?

More discussions about estimate
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the Forest Service and Wilderness Society acreages differ, the estimates of the percentage of old-growth currently protected is quite similar.
While the requirement to use the best estimate of each of the underlying assumptions is consistent with the approach taken by Statement 87 for pension plans, it will prove to be more difficult to implement because of the variables unique to other postemployment plans, namely the expectations about the future use and costs of health care.
SE] point estimate was calculated as: 4,330 x (585/3,964) x (12/15) x 38.
We also identify the conditions under which the effect estimates on survival associated with short-term exposures are equivalent to effect estimates from time-series studies.
Splitting the major groups in this way allows the capture of more information for deriving capacity estimates.
The debate over yield estimates was reportedly rejuvenated within the government this year after two advisory panels to the Department of Defense (DOD) considered the use of surface waves -- seismic signals that travel along the surface of the earth--in addition to the body waves now used in yield estimates of big explosions.
As a result, employers of employees who receive tips must now develop procedures that will reasonably estimate total tip income, suitable to their situation.
By way of these estimates it should be possible to separate the component of the Z effect due to direct association of Z with Y (by virtue of the estimated intercept [[delta].
The need to rely on assumptions to generate estimates highlights the gaps in our understanding of foodborne diseases.
Taxpayers' objection to the IRS's definition of the tax gap is not only crystal clear but, we submit, unassailable: the estimates are based on the examining agent's proposals even where those proposals are ultimately reversed.
Estimates were based on engineering and consulting studies as well as on negotiations with regulatory authorities.
Thus, for individuals (unlike trusts), the January 15 estimate must include all income up through and including December.