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estimate

 [es´tĭ-ma]
1. a rough calculation or one based on incomplete data.
2. a statistic used to characterize the value of a population parameter. Called also estimator.
3. (es´tĭ-māt) to produce or use such a calculation or statistic.

es·ti·mate

(es'tĭ-māt),
1. A measurement or a statement about the value of some quantity that is known, believed, or suspected to incorporate some degree of error.
2. The result of applying any estimator to a random sample of data. It is not a random variable but a realization of one, a fixed quantity, and it has no variance although commonly it also furnishes an estimate of what the variance of the estimator is. (Not to be confused with an estimator, which is a prescription for obtaining an estimate.)
[L. aestimo, pp. aestimatum, to appraise]

estimate

/es·ti·mate/
1. (es´tĭ-mat) a rough calculation or one based on incomplete data.
2. (es´tĭ-mat) a statistic used to characterize the value of a population parameter.
3. (es´tĭ-māt) to produce or use such a calculation or statistic.

estimate

A popular term for an educated guess about a thing or process. See Cookie cutter estimate, Demand-based estimate, Objective probability estimate, Subjective probability estimate.

es·ti·mate

(es'ti-măt)
1. A measurement or a statement about the value of some quantity that is known, believed, or suspected to incorporate some degree of error.
2. The result of applying any estimator to a random sample of data. It is not a random variable but a realization of one, a fixed quantity, and it has no variance although commonly it also furnishes an estimate of what the variance of the estimator is. usage note Not to be confused with an estimator, which is a prescription for obtaining an estimate.
[L. aestimo, pp. aestimatum, to appraise]

es·ti·mate

(es'ti-măt)
1. A measurement or a statement about the value of some quantity that is known, believed, or suspected to incorporate some degree of error.
2. The result of applying any estimator to a random sample of data.
[L. aestimo, pp. aestimatum, to appraise]

estimate,

n the anticipated fee for dental services to be performed.

estimate

a measurement which is believed likely to incorporate a degree of error.

Patient discussion about estimate

Q. Hi friends, I like to estimate my body fat based on my height and weight. Hi friends, I like to estimate my body fat based on my height and weight. When I enquired about this I heard about BMI. Though I understood little about it I want to know more about what is BMI and why is it useful?

A. the BMI is not a very good method...it only helps if you are an average person. you can gain weight if you start training and still get in shape and loose fat. but it is our only cheap method...there are gyms that hold a way of measuring body fat- maybe try going to one of those?

More discussions about estimate
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, a mathematical model for disease transmission fitted to available data can provide estimates of R (1).
Generally, estimates have to be well-reasoned and based on all available information.
Issues relating to estimates and judgments in the financial reporting process should be discussed.
Based on more than 40 years of experience and after the thousands of demolition estimates I have prepared, ranging from $500 to $30 million.
Others, however, believe that historical cost provides a more useful measure because it more clearly represents the economics of business performance and because fair value estimates may not be reliable or verifiable.
For example, if a sample of size 300 achieves 10-percent relative precision on the 100-percent deductible amount using standard statistical estimates, the sample size might jump to 800 or 1,000 to achieve 10-percent relative precision, calculated as specified in the revenue procedure on the amount that moves to 100-percent deductible.
Still more recently, it has been suggested that, the use of GAMs to analyze time-series data results in air pollution risk estimates being biased upward and that concurvity in the rime-series data results in standard error estimates being biased downward.
Researchers first align the signals based on estimates of time translation errors, determined from a cross-correlation analysis of all possible pairs of signals.
Fair value estimates differ from other accounting estimates because when market prices are not available management must estimate fair value using an "appropriate" approach and assumptions that reflect those that individuals in the marketplace would make.
During the trial period, National Park Service personnel completed more than 200,000 estimates ranging from single campgrounds to an entire newly planned visitors center.
Total exposure estimates could reach as high as $4 billion for insurers.
Portland, Oregon has studied the effects of overestimating emissions and realized the benefits of critically evaluating its emission estimates.

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