esotropia


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esotropia

 [es″o-tro´pe-ah]
strabismus in which there is manifest deviation of the visual axis of one eye toward that of the other eye, resulting in diplopia; called also cross-eye and convergent strabismus. adj., adj esotrop´ic.

es·o·tro·pi·a

(es'ō-trō'pē-ă),
The form of strabismus in which the visual axes converge; may be paralytic or concomitant, monocular or alternating, accommodative or nonaccommodative.
[G. esō, inward, + tropē, turn]

esotropia

/eso·tro·pia/ (-tro´pe-ah) cross-eye; deviation of the visual axis of one eye toward that of the other eye.esotrop´ic

esotropia

(ĕs′ə-trō′pē-ə)
n.
A form of strabismus in which one or both of the eyes deviate inward. Also called crossed eyes, cross-eye.

es′o·trop′ic (-trŏp′ĭk, -trō′pĭk) adj.

esotropia

[es′ətrō′pē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, eso + tropos, turning
a medial deviation of one eye relative to the other fixating eye such that fusion is not maintained. Also called convergent squint, convergent strabismus, internal strabismus. Compare esophoria, exotropia. See also strabismus. esotropic, adj.
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Esotropia

strabismus

Nonparallel positioning or movement of the eyes—usually of the vertical axis—due to decreased binocular muscle coordination with loss of stereoscopic vision and inability to focus simultaneously on a single point.
 
Aetiology
Extraocular muscle defects, neurotoxins, blindness, mechanical defects, unilateral vision obstruction in childhood, various brain disorders or systemic diseases, amblyopia, paralytic shellfish poisoning, botulism, haemangioma near eye, Guillain-Barré syndrome, Apert syndrome, Noonan syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, trisomy 18, congenital rubella, incontinentia pigmenti, cerebral palsy, Laurence-Moon-Biedl syndrome, pseudohyperparathyroidism.

esotropia

Convergent strabismus Ophthalmology Strabismus characterized by a convergence of the visual axes. See Strabismus.

es·o·tro·pi·a

(es'ō-trō'pē-ă)
The form of strabismus in which the visual axes converge; may be paralytic or concomitant, monocular or alternating, accommodative or nonaccommodative.
Synonym(s): convergent strabismus.
[G. esō, inward, + tropē, turn]

esotropia

Convergent squint, or STRABISMUS. Only one eye looks directly at the object of regard, the other being turned inwards. Esotropia in children calls for urgent treatment to avoid amblyopia. Compare EXOTROPIA.

esotropia

A synonym for convergent strabismus. See accommodative strabismus; convergent strabismus.
blind spot esotropia See Swann's syndrome.
consecutive esotropia See consecutive strabismus.
infantile esotropia See infantile strabismus.
non-accommodative acquired esotropia See non-accommodative acquired strabismus.

esotropia

strabismus in which there is deviation of the visual axis of one eye toward that of the other eye, resulting in diplopia. Called also cross-eye and convergent strabismus. Commonly seen in Siamese cats.
References in periodicals archive ?
Conversely, as is shown in Table 5, the mean P100 amplitude of the patients with esotropia, when compared to that in the group with anisometropia, exhibited a significant difference in response to high-contrast and large check-size stimuli compared to the other stimuli.
The patients whose examinations were performed properly and data kept regularly, esotropia corrected to ortotropia with full hyperopic correction were included in the study.
Previous studies have reported that the most common types of strabismus that lead to surgery are esotropia and exotropia (9-10).
With trial frame: small alternating esotropia with diplopia reported
His conviction was put to the test when his youngest son, Andrew, was born with esotropia and extreme farsightedness.
Carson has a small head, absent frenulum (a fold of mucous membrane under the tongue, which limits the movement of the tongue, aiding speech and eating), esotropia of the eyes (cross-eye; internal or convergent strabismus), and has worn glasses since he was 6- months old.
Functional indications include patients with significant anisometropia (unequal refractive error in each eye) and esotropia (one or more crossed eyes).
For an esotropia and exotropia deviation, the corneal reflex in the deviated eye appears displaced temporally and nasally, respectively.
A 46-year-old male patient was referred to our clinic with complaints of diplopia and esotropia in his right eye that developed after a car accident.
The prevalence of myopic among tropias was 10%, exotropia was more commonly seen than esotropia (5%).
Babies with congenital or infantile esotropia in particular have a poor prognosis for achieving binocular fusion if left untreated and should be referred to a pediatric ophthalmologist as soon as possible.