esophoric

es·o·phor·ic

(es'ō-fōr'ik),
Relating to or marked by esophoria.

es·o·phor·ic

(es'ō-fōr'ik)
Relating to or marked by esophoria.
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References in periodicals archive ?
34) Clinical tests show a reduction in the amplitude of accommodation, reduced accommodative facility, reduced near vision/ visual acuity and an exophoria at near on cover test that becomes relatively esophoric if the patient tries to exert more accommodation.
Esophoric (inward deviation) and exophoric (outward deviation) eye posture was determined using the Howell card at distance and near.
Also, in the early postoperative period, orthophotic or [less than or equal to] 10 PD esophoric patients have a higher final surgical success rate.
Successful and unsuccessful surgical results in orthophoric, < 10 PD exophoric, and < 10 PD esophoric patients 1 week and 6 months post surgery Successful Unsuccessful P n=181 n=85 Orthophoric Patients 1 week post surgery (n=86) 70 (38.
So, to encourage someone to view this esophoric film would only be an act for curiosity's sake.
There were no differences in visual status among groups, and each group contained esophoric and exophoric participants (see the next section).
In Condition 2, two participants showed an esophoric shift in the distance-associated heterophoria.
For esophoric devations, negative fusional amplitudes are exercised and increased by using base in prisms.
For esophoric deviations, the negative relative convergence is exercised and increased.
In esophoric deviations, base out prism is introduced in front of one eye, increasing until the nonius markers on the Mallet unit line up (use base in prism for exophoric deviations and base up for hyperphoric deviations).
Of the remaining 190 patients, cover test revealed 86% to be orthophoric, 13% to be exophoric and only 1% were esophoric.
For example, some patients may be orthophoric at their reading distance (eg, 40cm), or even esophoric, and yet not be able to converge to 10cm.