stethoscope

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stethoscope

 [steth´o-skōp]
an instrument used to hear and amplify the sounds produced by the heart, lungs, and other internal organs. As first introduced by the 19th century French physician, René Laënnec, it was a simple wooden tube with a bell-shaped opening at one end. The modern stethoscope is binaural, with two earpieces and flexible tubing leading to them from the two-branched opening of the bell or cone. In this way, sound travels simultaneously through both branches to the earpieces. adj., adj stethoscop´ic.
Parts of a stethoscope. From Elkin et al., 2000.

steth·o·scope

(steth'ō-skōp),
An instrument originally devised by Laennec for aid in hearing the respiratory and cardiac sounds in the chest, but now modified in various ways and used in auscultation of any of vascular or other sounds anywhere in the body.
[stetho- + G. skopeō, to view]

stethoscope

/stetho·scope/ (steth´o-skōp) an instrument for performing mediate auscultation.stethoscop´ic

stethoscope

(stĕth′ə-skōp′)
n.
Any of various instruments used for listening to sounds produced within the body.

steth′o·scop′ic (-skŏp′ĭk), steth′o·scop′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
steth′o·scop′i·cal·ly adv.
ste·thos′co·py (stĕ-thŏs′kə-pē) n.

stethoscope

[steth′əskōp]
Etymology: Gk, stethos, chest, skopein, to look
an instrument consisting of two earpieces connected by means of flexible tubing to a diaphragm, which is placed against the skin of the patient's chest or back to hear heart and lung sounds. It is also used to hear bowel sounds.
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Stethoscope
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Stethoscope placement for auscultation of lung sounds

stethoscope

Medical practice An instument with a Y-shaped flexible tube that connects at one end to a bell-shaped device fitted with a piece of hardened plastic that amplifies sound and, at the other, to 2 ear pieces for listening to various sounds from the heart, lungs, GI tract, etc Popular media That really cool thingie that TV docs carry around to impress people. See Sphygmomanometer, White coat.

steth·o·scope

(steth'ŏ-skōp)
An instrument originally devised by Laënnec for aid in hearing the respiratory and cardiac sounds in the chest, but now modified in various ways and used in auscultation of any of vascular or other sounds anywhere in the body.
[G. stethos, chest + G. skopeō, to view]

stethoscope

A binaural or monaural tube that conveys sounds conveniently from the body of a patient to the ears of the examining physician or other person. From the Greek stethos , chest and skopein , to look at; from which it will be seen that the name of the instrument was carelessly chosen. The careful auscultator will often close his or her eyes, the better to hear all the subtleties of body sounds, especially heart murmurs.

Stethoscope

A Y-shaped instrument that amplifies body sounds such as heartbeat, breathing, and air in the intestine. Used in auscultation.

steth·o·scope

(steth'ŏ-skōp)
An instrument used in auscultation of vascular or other sounds anywhere in body.
[G. stethos, chest + G. skopeō, to view]

stethoscope

an instrument used to hear and amplify the sounds produced by the heart, lungs and other internal organs.
The modern stethoscope is binaural, with two earpieces and flexible rubber leading to them from the two-branched opening of the bell or cone. In this way, sound travels simultaneously through both of the branches to the earpieces. See also phonendoscope.

electronic stethoscope
audible sounds are magnified through an amplifier to earphones, of which there may be more than one set, and may be broadcast through loudspeakers, but in both instances the results are mediocre.
esophageal stethoscope
one passed into the esophagus with the tip positioned at the level of the heart. It provides an excellent means of monitoring heart sounds and respiration while the animal is anesthetized.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is highly probable that surrounding noise that was not completely removed accounted for the slight difference in heart rate between the esophageal stethoscope and ECG.
Of course, the relationship between adult heart function and heart sound obtained through precordial auscultation has been researched before, but almost no research has been conducted regarding the esophageal stethoscope.
In conclusion, the esophageal stethoscope is a non-invasive tool that can be placed in close proximity to the heart for monitoring.
The correlation between the first heart sound and cardiac output as measured by using digital esophageal stethoscope under anaesthesia.
Esophageal stethoscope and heart sounds have been studied in various clinical studies.
Accordingly this experiment used the esophageal stethoscope.
Therefore it would be possible to more easily analyze the heart sound and monitor the hemodynamic changes of the patients by using the esophageal stethoscope and the wireless Bluetooth transmission for which installation and analysis is relatively simple if additional researches on the relationship between the hemodynamic changes and the heart sound are carried out in the future.
As the result of analysis of the heart sound and the systolic blood pressure through the esophageal stethoscope and the wireless Bluetooth transmission it was possible to confirm that the blood pressure has positive correlation with each of S1 S2 and S1/ S2.
In addition development of equipment for the monitoring of the hemodynamic changes of patients by using the esophageal stethoscope and the wireless Bluetooth transmission for