mucosa of esophagus

(redirected from esophageal mucosa)

mucosa of esophagus

[TA]
the inner coat of the esophagus.
References in periodicals archive ?
A biopsy of the esophageal mucosa was obtained; it was negative for cytomegalovirus (CMV) virocytes, but positive for candida species.
These proteins might help regulate antigenic penetration of the esophageal mucosa and could permit migration of white blood cells, the investigators said.
Numerous thin, white, up to 1-cm-long nematodes, identified as S incognita, were observed embedded in the pharyngeal and esophageal mucosa under the diphtheritic membranes.
The article titled "The Significance of 'Indefinite for Dysplasia' Grading in Barrett Metaplasia" by Mamoun Younes et al (1) reports that esophageal mucosa diagnosed as indefinite for dysplasia (IND), when present in samples from at least 2 levels of the esophagus (INDM), is as likely as low-grade dysplasia (LGD) to progress to high-grade dysplasia or carcinoma.
An inlet patch can be diagnosed clinically based on the endoscopic appearance of a salmon-red patch demarcated from the surrounding pearl-gray esophageal mucosa (figure) and histologically by the presence of gastric-type mucosa.
This minimally-invasive technique is a major advancement because it offers patients an alternative to traditional surgery which removes the esophagus entirely, or to endoscopic procedures that examine and remove abnormal segments of the esophageal mucosa but may miss an underlying malignancy.
This initiates peristalsis and exposure of the esophageal mucosa to saliva rich in bicarbonate.
11) Increased exposure of the esophageal mucosa to acid and pepsin, which initially damages intercellular junctions, leads to increased mucosal permeability.
It is clear from our study that the oral and esophageal mucosa and the tonsils are likely to be the most important sites of viral entry," reports Sodora.
However, if it becomes a regular occurrence, it will sometimes result in damage to the esophageal mucosa.
They report an incident in which a 36-year-old man required major surgery to remove a serrated beer bottle cap accidentally lodged in his esophageal mucosa.
This new treatment paradigm could become a more effective replacement for the existing standard of care that requires random biopsies of esophageal mucosa in areas that appear normal when Barrett's esophagus is suspected.