diverticulum

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Related to esophageal diverticulum: Zenker diverticulum

diverticulum

 [di″ver-tik´u-lum] (pl. diverti´cula) (L.)
a circumscribed pouch or sac occurring normally or created by herniation of the lining mucous membrane through a defect in the muscular coat of a tubular organ. See illustration.
Intestinal diverticula. From Dorland's, 2000.
ileal diverticulum Meckel's diverticulum.
intestinal diverticulum a pouch or sac formed by hernial protrusion of the mucous membrane through a defect in the muscular coat of the intestine.
Meckel's diverticulum an occasional sacculation or appendage of the ileum, derived from an unobliterated yolk stalk.
pressure diverticulum (pulsion diverticulum) a sac or pouch formed by hernial protrusion of the mucous membrane through the muscular coat of the esophagus or colon as a result of pressure from within.
traction diverticulum a localized distortion, angulation, or funnel-shaped bulging of the esophageal wall, due to adhesions resulting from an external lesion.

di·ver·tic·u·lum

, pl.

di·ver·tic·u·la

(dī'vĕr-tik'yū-lŭm, dī'vĕr-tik'yū-lă), [TA] Avoid the incorrect plurals diverticulae and diverticuli.
A pouch or sac opening from a tubular or saccular organ, such as the gut or bladder.
[L. deverticulum (or di-), a by-road, fr. de-verto, to turn aside]

diverticulum

/di·ver·tic·u·lum/ (di″ver-tik´u-lum) pl. diverti´cula   a circumscribed pouch or sac occurring normally or created by herniation of the lining mucous membrane through a defect in the muscular coat of a tubular organ.
allantoic diverticulum  the endodermal sacculation that becomes the allantois; in humans it is an outpouching of the caudal wall of the yolk sac that becomes the urachus.
ileal diverticulum , Meckel's diverticulum an occasional sacculation or appendage of the ileum, derived from an unobliterated yolk stalk.

diverticulum

(dī′vûr-tĭk′yə-ləm)
n. pl. diverticu·la (-lə)
A pouch or sac branching out from a hollow organ or structure, such as the intestine.

di′ver·tic′u·lar adj.

diverticulum

[dī′vurtik′yo̅o̅ləm] pl. diverticula
Etymology: L, diverticulare, to turn aside
a pouchlike herniation through the muscular wall of a tubular organ. A diverticulum may be present in the stomach, the small intestine, or, most commonly, the colon. It is typically detected by radiography after the ingestion of a radiopaque substance. See also diverticulitis, diverticulosis, Meckel's diverticulum. diverticular, adj.

di·ver·tic·u·lum

, pl. diverticula (dī'vĕr-tik'yū-lŭm, -lă) [TA]
A pouch or sac opening from a tubular or saccular organ, such as the gut or bladder.
[L. deverticulum (or di-), a by-road, fr. de-verto, to turn aside]

diverticulum

(di?ver-tik'u-lum) plural.diverticula [L. devertere, to turn aside]
Enlarge picture
DIVERTICULA OF THE COLON
An outpouching of the walls of a canal or organ. See: illustration

diverticulum of the colon

An outpocketing of the colon. These may be asymptomatic until they become inflamed.

diverticulum of the duodenum

A diverticulum commonly located near the entrance of the common bile or pancreatic duct.

false diverticulum

A diverticulum without a muscular coat in the wall or pouch. This type of diverticulum is acquired.

gastric diverticulum

A pulsion-type diverticulum usually on the lesser curvature of the esophagogastric junction.

diverticulum of the jejunum

A diverticulum usually marked by severe pain in the upper abdomen, followed occasionally by a massive hemorrhage from the intestine.

Meckel's diverticulum

See: Meckel's diverticulum

diverticulum of the stomach

A diverticulum of the stomach wall.

true diverticulum

A diverticulum involving all the coats of muscle in the pouch wall. It is usually congenital.

Zenker's diverticulum

See: Zenker's diverticulum

diverticulum

An out-pouching from, or sac formation on, a hollow organ or structure, such as the bowel. See also DIVERTICULOSIS.

diverticulum

any sac or pouch formed by herniation of the wall of a tubular organ or part, especially the intestines. Inflammation of a diverticulum leads to DIVERTICULITIS.

Diverticulum

Small tubes or pouches that project off the wall of the intestine, visible as opaque on an x ray after the patient has swallowed a contrast (dye) substance.

diverticulum,

n sac-like herniation occurring in a muscular organ wall, such as the small intestine, stomach, or colon.

diverticulum

pl. diverticula [L.] a circumscribed pouch or sac occurring normally or created by herniation of the lining mucous membrane through a defect in the muscular coat of a tubular organ.

auditory tube diverticulum
dorsal urethra diverticulum
a small pouch dorsal to the urethra in the male ruminant.
esophageal diverticulum
a congenital or acquired localized dilatation or outpouching of the esophageal wall in which food and liquids may accumulate. Pulsion (or pressure) diverticula result from increased intraluminal pressure and protrusion of mucosa through the muscular wall. Traction diverticula are created by periesophageal inflammation, fibrosis and adhesions to surrounding structures. Vascular ring anomalies are a common cause of anterior thoracic esophageal diverticula in dogs. Epiphrenic are those located between the heart base and diaphragm.
Clinical signs include dysphagia and regurgitation, and esophageal obstruction by impacted food may occur.
intestinal diverticulum
a pouch or sac formed by hernial protrusion of the mucous membrane through a defect in the muscular coat of the intestine.
nasal diverticulum
the part of the horse's nostril dorsal to the alar fold leads into this blind pouch, which is lined with skin. Called also false nostril.
pressure diverticulum
see esophageal diverticulum (above).
pulsion diverticulum
see esophageal diverticulum (above).
rectal diverticulum
weakness and rupture of the muscular layer of the rectal wall allows formation of a pocket. Most commonly seen in dogs in association with perineal hernia. There is straining and an obvious bulge beside the anus.
stomach diverticulum
a small pouch at the left end of the pig's stomach, close to the esophageal entry into the stomach.
suburethral diverticulum
lies below the opening of the urethra of the cow.
traction diverticulum
see esophageal diverticulum (above).
diverticulum tubae auditivae

Patient discussion about diverticulum

Q. How to prevent diverticulitis? I am a 43 year old man. I just had colonoscopy and my Doctor said I have diverticulosis and am at risk in developing diverticulitis. How can I prevent developing diverticulitis?

A. You have Diverticulosis, which means you have diverticulas (small pouches) on your digestive system. These diverticula are permanent and will not go away. No treatment has been found to prevent complications of diverticular disease. Diet high in fiber increases stool bulk and prevents constipation, and theoretically may help prevent further diverticular formation or worsening of the diverticular condition. Some doctors recommend avoiding nuts, corn, and seeds which can plug diverticular openings and cause diverticulitis. Whether avoidance of such foods is beneficial is unclear. If you develop unexplained fever, chills or abdominal pain, you should notify your doctor immediately since it could be a complication of diverticulitis.

More discussions about diverticulum