procedure

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procedure

 [pro-se´jer]
a series of steps for doing something; see also maneuver, method, operation, surgery, and technique. For specific types of procedures, see under the name.

pro·ce·dure

(prō-sē'jŭr),
Act or conduct of diagnosis, treatment, or operation.
See also: method, operation, technique.

procedure

/pro·ce·dure/ (pro-se´jer) the manner of performing something; a method or technique.
arterial switch procedure  a one-step method for correction of transposition of the great arteries.
Burch procedure  a type of bladder neck suspension.
endocardial resection procedure  (ERP) surgical removal of a portion of left ventricular endocardium and underlying myocardium containing an arrhythmogenic area from the base of an aneurysm or infarction in order to relieve ventricular tachycardia associated with ischemic heart disease.
Fontan procedure  functional correction of tricuspid atresia by anastomosis of, or insertion of a nonvalved prosthesis between, the right atrium and pulmonary artery with closure of the interatrial communication.
Pereyra procedure  a type of bladder neck suspension.

procedure

[prəsē′jər]
Etymology: L, procedere, to proceed
the sequence of steps to be followed in establishing some course of action.

procedure

Medtalk An 'invasive' service performed by a physician, which is arbitrarily divided into major–eg, general, orthopedic, cardiovascular, or other surgical procedures, ambulatory or outPt–eg, radial keratotomy procedures, and endoscopic procedures. See BAK procedure, Batista procedure, Booked procedure, Coronary revascularization procedure, Cough-inducing procedure, Cyclodestructive procedure, Diagnostic procedure, DIEP flap procedure, Disciplinary procedure, Dor procedure, Downstream procedure, Ertl procedure, Experimental procedure, Goebell-Stöckel procedure, Hartmann procedure, Hearing-sparing procedure, Heller-Dor procedure, High-discretion procedure, High-risk & complex procedure, High-yield procedure, In & out procedure, Indiana pouch procedure, Infection control procedure, Labyrnithine procedure, LEEP procedure, Life-prolonging procedure, Localization procedure, Low-yield procedure, LTPs procedure, Maintenance procedure, Manchester procedure, Marshall-Marchetti-Krantz procedure, Maze procedure, Minor procedure, Mumford procedure, Myocardial laser revascularization procedure, Neuroablative procedure, No/NA procedure, Overvalued procedure, Physician-performed microscopy procedure, Pinup procedure, Potts procedure, Regnauld procedure, Ross procedure, Sauvé-Kapandji procedure, Scalp-lifting procedure, Shirodkar procedure, Special firefighting procedure, Standard operating procedure, Upstream procedure, Ultra-rapid opiate detoxification procedure, Whipple procedure, Wrap-around procedure, Yes/no procedure, Yes/yes procedure. Cf Evaluation and management service, Physician test.

pro·ce·dure

(prŏ-sē'jŭr)
Act or conduct of diagnosis, treatment, or operation.
See also: method, operation, technique

procedure 

A specific way of doing something. The term is commonly used for surgical operations. See method.
advancement procedure See recession.
Faden procedure A surgical procedure designed to weaken the action of an extraocular muscle by reattaching it to the globe posterior to its original insertion. By attaching the muscle to the eye at this point, the arc of contact of the muscle is changed, thus weakening the muscle in its field of action. The procedure can be used to treat dissociated vertical deviations, nystagmus, as well as cases of incomitant strabismus (e.g. Brown's superior oblique tendon sheath syndrome, Duane's syndrome). Syn. posterior fixation suture. See arc of contact; strabismus surgery.
Hummelsheim's procedure See transposition.
Jensen procedure See transposition.
Knapp procedure See transposition.
Tuck procedure A strabismus surgical procedure in which a muscle or tendon is folded upon itself in order to effectively shorten and strengthen it. This procedure is commonly performed in cases of superior oblique paresis. It may also be used in cases of mild ptosis to shorten the levator palpebrae aponeurosis.

pro·ce·dure

(prŏ-sē'jŭr)
Act or conduct of diagnosis, treatment, or operation.

procedure (prōsē´jur),

n a series of steps followed in a regular, orderly, definite way, by which a desired result is accomplished.
procedure, dental prosthetic laboratory,
n the steps in the fabrication of a dental prosthesis that do not require the presence of the patient for their accomplishment.
procedure, invasive,
n a series of steps that causes bleeding or the possibility of bleeding.
procedure, Kazanjian's
procedure, operating,
n the technique or method of conducting or performing an operation or form of treatment.
procedure, order of,
n the sequence of steps made in performing an operation or following through a technique. In cavity preparation the sequence is as follows: (1) obtain the required outline form, (2) obtain the required resistance form, (3) obtain the required retention form, (4) retain the required convenience form, (5) remove any remaining carious dentin, (6) finish the enamel walls, and (7) make the debridement.
procedure, orthodontic,
n the therapeutic measures employed to correct malalignment and malposition of the teeth and to immobilize and stabilize periodontally involved or previously moved teeth.
procedure, restorative,
n a method or mode of action that reestablishes or reforms a tooth or teeth or portions thereof to anatomic or functional form and health.

Patient discussion about procedure

Q. What are the dangers of a liposuction procedure? I am nervous about my decision to do liposuction and wanted to know more about the risks in this procedure.

A. Liposuction complications may include: infection, extended healing time, allergic reaction to medication or anesthesia, fat or blood clots - clots can migrate to the lungs and lead to death, excessive fluid loss - fluid loss can lead to shock, fluid accumulation - fluid must be drained, friction burns, damage to the skin or nerves, damage to vital organs. The dangers of excessive liposuction include risks associated with removing too much fat from targeted areas at once, as well as having too much liposuction performed in a single day. Excessive liposuction can cause problems including dents, lumps, and sagging

Q. Has anyone had a bad experience with Lasik? I am considering the procedure but am worried about the risks.

A. i know several ophthalmologist- and they all ware glasses...it's like a giant experiment on people- no one really knows what will be the long reach out come of it. but then again, cellular radiation is also a world wide experiment..so i stay with my glasses for now, but that's because i'm not a big risk taker.

Q. I developed an AV Fistula after a heart catherization procedure. I am bleeding through the tissues in left arm I am on coumadin, but currently have a lower than usual INR. Corrective surgery was scheduled for yesterday, but had to be delayed. I am concerned that I have a large amount of blood (dark red) bleeding though the tissues right under the skin in my left arm. Should I seek immediate medical attention? The bleeding is over approximately a 3 and 1/2" area on my left arm. Came about in a period of a few minutes.

A. well, you are on blood thinners. i wouldn't take the chance. i mean- i'm not sure i follow what is happening over there. it could be a severe problem or nothing. i would let a doctor check it out. the worse thing that could happen is you wasting a day at the hospital, on the other end of that scenario- you can end up dead. i would go with the first one.

More discussions about procedure
References in periodicals archive ?
The Escheat movement also articulated the interests of the Acadian inhabitants of Prince Edward Island.
Moreover, while states seemingly are forever adjusting escheat laws, businesses are also adjusting their practices in response to those laws.
Collectively, these last two provisions are referred to as the Second Rule of Escheat.
Even in those fairly unusual circumstances in which both the first and second priority states have adopted B2B exemptions, the state in which the transaction occurred could seek to escheat the credit balance on the basis of its "third priority" rights, as long as such state has adopted the third priority rule and has not adopted a B2B exemption.
Plaintiff alleged that enactment of Section 1155 in 2010 of the Delaware Escheat Act violates the Ex Post Facto Clause of the U.
Gift certificates, payroll checks, electronic gift cards, security deposits, mineral rights and royalties are among a plethora of property types now subject to escheat in various jurisdictions.
New Jersey's escheat priority rules in the face of vigorous state challenges.
21 requires escheat property to be reported either in an expendable trust fund or in the fund to which the property ultimately will revert.
Today's escheat laws began as a way for the king to claim ownership of real property whose owner had died without heirs.
According to the GASB, practitioners' differing interpretations of current standards dealing with escheat property can lead to different accounting treatments for similar property.
NEW YORK -- Unclaimed Property Recovery & Reporting (UPRR), a leader in the unclaimed property market since 1996 specializing in owner location, asset delivery, escheat compliance, and risk management in the investment industry, announced today it will expand its service offerings to assist the oil & gas industry.
Promotion of responsible legislation on escheat and other critical issues