eschar

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eschar

 [es´kahr]
1. a slough produced by a thermal burn or a corrosive application, or by gangrene.

es·char

(es'kar),
A thick, coagulated crust or slough which develops following a thermal burn or chemical or physical cauterization of the skin.
[G. eschara, a fireplace, a scab caused by burning]

eschar

/es·char/ (es´kahr)
1. a slough produced by a thermal burn, by a corrosive application, or by gangrene.

eschar

(ĕs′kär′)
n.
A dry scab or slough formed on the skin as a result of a burn or by the action of a corrosive or caustic substance.

eschar

[es′kär]
Etymology: Gk, eschara, scab
a scab or dry crust that results from trauma, such as a thermal or chemical burn, infection, or excoriating skin disease. escharotic, adj.

es·char

(es'kahr)
A thick, coagulated crust or slough that develops following a thermal burn or chemical or physical cauterization of the skin.
[G. eschara, a fireplace, a scab caused by burning]
Enlarge picture
ESCHAR

eschar

(es'kar?) [Gr. eschara, hearth, brazier, burning coal, burn, scab]
Dead matter that is cast off from the surface of the skin, esp. after a burn. The tissue is hard, black or brown, and leathery in texture.
See: illustration; escharotic

eschar

An area of dead, separated tissue (SLOUGH) produced by skin damage by a caustic substance or a burn.

Eschar

A hard crust or scab. In scrub typhus, an eschar forms over the initial sore from the chigger bite.

eschar

crust or coagulum formed in response to topical thermal/chemical cautery (e.g. caustic application)

eschar

a deep cutaneous slough such as that produced by a thermal burn, a corrosive action, a decubitus ulcer, a saddle gall or setfast.
References in periodicals archive ?
Distribution of eschars on body of scrub typhus patients: a prospective study.
28) These cases more closely resembled SF rickettsial infections with high fevers, headaches, arthralgias, myalgias, eschars, rashes, and evidence of CNS involvement with photophobia, hearing loss, and meningismus.
cases 36 21 Geographic location Zimbabwe and Algeria, France, Morocco, South Africa Portugal, South Africa Median age [+ or -] 58 [+ or -] 12 53 [+ or -] 18 SD (IQR), y (31-80) (10-80) Female sex 14 (39) 7 (33) Recent travel 36 17 Clinical signs Fever 35 (97) 21 (100) Rash 24 (67) 20 (95) Enlarged lymph nodes 15 (42) 3 (14) Lymphadenopathy location Cervical 1 (3) 3 (14) Inguinal 14 (39) 0 Axillary 0 0 Eschar 36 (100) 18 (86) Multiple eschars 13 (36) 0 Eschar location Scalp 0 2 (10) Lower limbs 32 (89) 3 (14) Upper limbs 2 (6) 2 (10) Trunk 2 (6) 5 (24) Neck 0 0 Lymphangitis 0 0 Treatment (duration, d) Doxycycline 34 (1 -20) 21 (7-21) Amoxicillin 2 (7) None Pristinamycin None 1 (7) Azithromycin None None Characteristic R.
Data collected regarding clinical profile of cases and eschar distribution.
Patients were considered possibly infected if they had clinical signs (fever, skin eschar, local lymph node enlargement) and if a removed tick was positive for Coxiella-like bacteria according to qPCR but no skin biopsy was sampled or when serologic results were positive.
The inoculation eschar at the tick bite site is a hallmark of many tickborne SPG rickettsioses.
Molecular detection of rickettsial DNA on eschar biopsies was performed by PCR, as described (13).
12) has shown that rickettsial infection could be diagnosed from noninvasively collected cutaneous lesion swab specimens from skin eschars from guinea pigs.
During July 2007-July 2011, six patients from the Mediterranean coast city of Elche, Spain, who had high fever and inoculation eschars received a diagnosis of infection with R.
Only 17 cases have been reported, for which 7 patients had lymphangitis, and 13 had inoculation eschars, including 2 patients with 2 eschars (1,2).
In an animal model, as long as eschars were present, rickettsial DNA was detected (2).
Multiple eschars were not identified on any patient.