escharotomy


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escharotomy

 [es″kah-rot´ah-me]
surgical incision of the eschar and superficial fascia of the chest or a circumferentially burned limb in order to permit the cut edges to separate and restore blood flow to unburned tissue. Edema may form beneath the inelastic eschar of a full-thickness burn and compress arteries, thus impairing blood flow and necessitating an escharotomy. The incision is protected from infection with the same antimicrobial agent being used on the burn wound.

es·cha·rot·o·my

(es'kă-rot'ŏ-mē),
Surgical incision in an eschar (necrotic dermis) to lessen constriction, especially after a circumferential third-degree burn, usually performed to treat or minimize pressure injury to underlying structures.
[eschar + G. tomē, incision]

escharotomy

(ĕs′kə-rŏt′ə-mē)
n.
Surgical incision into a burn eschar to lessen its pull on the surrounding tissue.

escharotomy

[es′kärot′əmē]
a surgical incision into necrotic tissue resulting from a severe burn. The procedure is sometimes necessary to prevent edema from generating sufficient interstitial pressure to impair capillary filling, causing ischemia.
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Escharotomy

escharotomy

Surgery An incision into an encircling scar–eg, of a 3rd degree burn to an extremity, to lessen the pressure on neurovascular structures

es·cha·rot·o·my

(es'kă-rot'ŏ-mē)
Surgical incision in an eschar to lessen constriction, as might be done following a burn.
[eschar + G. tomē, incision]

escharotomy

surgical incision of the eschar and superficial fascia of a circumferentially burned limb in order to permit the cut edges to separate and restore blood flow to unburned tissue distal to the eschar. Edema may form beneath the inelastic eschar of a full-thickness burn and compress arteries, thus impairing blood flow and necessitating an escharotomy. The incision is protected from infection with the same antimicrobial agent being used on the burn wound.
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In this context, while continued ventilation, sedation and fluid resuscitation with the intent of supporting the end-of-life needs of family and patient were considered by both teams to be acceptable, more invasive interventions such as external cardiac massage in the event of cardiac arrest or surgical escharotomy in the event of abdominal compartment syndrome or burns-restricted ventilation were not deemed appropriate.
The concept of an escharotomy for a burn eschar may fall short of adequate decompression of burnt tissues, necessitating frequent re-assessment and possible conversion of an eschar release to a fascial release.
Edema occurs frequently with second- and third-degree burns and may even require intervention in the form of escharotomy.