eschar


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eschar

 [es´kahr]
1. a slough produced by a thermal burn or a corrosive application, or by gangrene.

es·char

(es'kar),
A thick, coagulated crust or slough which develops following a thermal burn or chemical or physical cauterization of the skin.
[G. eschara, a fireplace, a scab caused by burning]

eschar

/es·char/ (es´kahr)
1. a slough produced by a thermal burn, by a corrosive application, or by gangrene.

eschar

(ĕs′kär′)
n.
A dry scab or slough formed on the skin as a result of a burn or by the action of a corrosive or caustic substance.

eschar

[es′kär]
Etymology: Gk, eschara, scab
a scab or dry crust that results from trauma, such as a thermal or chemical burn, infection, or excoriating skin disease. escharotic, adj.

es·char

(es'kahr)
A thick, coagulated crust or slough that develops following a thermal burn or chemical or physical cauterization of the skin.
[G. eschara, a fireplace, a scab caused by burning]
Enlarge picture
ESCHAR

eschar

(es'kar?) [Gr. eschara, hearth, brazier, burning coal, burn, scab]
Dead matter that is cast off from the surface of the skin, esp. after a burn. The tissue is hard, black or brown, and leathery in texture.
See: illustration; escharotic

eschar

An area of dead, separated tissue (SLOUGH) produced by skin damage by a caustic substance or a burn.

Eschar

A hard crust or scab. In scrub typhus, an eschar forms over the initial sore from the chigger bite.

eschar

a deep cutaneous slough such as that produced by a thermal burn, a corrosive action, a decubitus ulcer, a saddle gall or setfast.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the dermal irritation test, erythema, eschar, and edema formation were observed 24 h after SDGE treatment, but the skin returned to normal after 72 h.
Detecting Rickettsia parkeri infection from eschar swab specimens.
Though every attempt should be made to look for the presence of eschar, especially at unusual sites, its absence does not rule out the disease since it is reportedly detected in only 30-50% of the cases (5-6).
This study used mouse models and eschar tissues excised between 11 and 26 days after burn injury.
The SF group rickettsioses, most of which are transmitted by ticks, share many common features in clinical presentations, including (1) incubation periods of approximately one week; (2) flu-like prodromes of high fever, fatigue, headache, myalgia, arthralgia, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain (that may mimic acute appendicitis in RMSF); (3) spotty rashes within three to five days of fever onset; and (4) necrotic eschars at tick-bite sites.
The eschar provides a devitalised, protein-rich environment, which further benefits bacterial proliferation through its exclusion from the systemic circulation and impaired local immune responses--hence the high susceptibility of the burn wound to infection.
Stable eschar on the heels serves as the body's natural cover and should not be removed.
The avascularity of the eschar results in impaired migration of host immune cells and restricts delivery of systemically administered antimicrobial agents to the area, while toxic substances released by eschar tissue impair local host immune responses.
Full thickness tissue loss in which the base of the ulcer is covered by slough (yellow, tan, gray, green or brown) and/or eschar (tan, brown or black) in the wound bed.
Conclusion: The availability of the ExplorAr Argon Plasma Cutting Electrode with the ConMed Argon Beam Coagulator makes it possible for a bloodless approach to the treatment of tongue ties and frenectomies with little or no post-operative pain due to the decreased power settings, lack of eschar and decreased collateral damage to adjacent tissues using a finer surgical technique.
Approximately 5 weeks after admission, the eschar had exfoliated, revealing that the underlying skin was pink and healthy; no significant areas of necrosis remained.
It softens eschar so you can easily debride it," she added.