erythropoietin therapy

erythropoietin therapy

The use of the hormone ERYTHROPOIETIN to promote new blood formation as an alternative to blood transfusion. This is feasible only in cases in which the patient's condition allows sufficient time for blood cell production. Erythropoietin therapy is also appropriate as a treatment for ANAEMIA caused by kidney failure, cancer or AIDS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Plasma hepcidin levels are elevated but responsive to erythropoietin therapy in renal disease.
Optimal erythropoietin therapy maintains near normal haemoglobin levels and has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of cardiovascular morbidity and repeated blood transfusions (Galliford et al.
2008) caution that doses of ascorbic acid as high as 500 mg a week for three weeks cannot be considered safe for patients with ESRD, and side effects must be considered when such a dose is administered to optimize erythropoietin therapy.
Acute systemic erythropoietin therapy to reduce delayed ischemic deficits following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a Phase II randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.
Anaemia is associated with several other consequences including fatigue (3), poor quality of life (4) and increased requirement for erythropoietin therapy (5).
Definitive answers as to whether erythropoietin therapy has a beneficial effect on these key outcomes are anticipated from the ongoing Amgen-sponsored phase III Reduction of Events With Darbepoetin Alfa in Heart Failure (RED-HF) trial, which is randomizing more than 3,000 patients.
BARCELONA -- Erythropoietin therapy in patients with anemia of heart failure resulted in improved exercise capacity, reduced heart failure symptoms, and decreased hospitalizations, and showed strong trends for reduced rates of MI and all-cause mortality in a meta-analysis of 11 small randomized clinical trials.
However, these benefits were demonstrated secondary to recombinant erythropoietin therapy and similar studies have not been conducted with the NESP product.
Erythropoietin therapy has been considered a first-line treatment, and blood transfusions should be limited to situations requiring immediate correction of haemoglobin levels.
Explanations for the decrease in the number of transfusions include limiting the volume of blood tests, the utilization of a smaller volume of blood to perform these tests, the use of noninvasive means of assessing oxygenation and ventilation (pulse oximetry and transcutaneous monitoring), the use of erythropoietin therapy, and the adoption of various restricted transfusion criteria.