series

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series

 [se´rēz]
a group or succession of events, objects, or substances arranged in regular order or forming a kind of chain; in electricity, parts of a circuit connected successively end to end to form a single path for the current. adj., adj se´rial.
erythrocyte series (erythrocytic series) the succession of morphologically distinguishable cells that that are stages in erythrocyte development: in order of maturity, the proerythroblast, basophilic erythroblast, polychromatophilic erythroblast, orthochromatic erythroblast, reticulocyte, and erythrocyte.
gastrointestinal series (GI series) an examination of the upper gastrointestinal tract using barium as the contrast medium for a series of x-ray films; see also barium test. Called also barium meal.
granulocyte series (granulocytic series) the succession of morphologically distinguishable cells that are stages in granulocyte development: in order of maturity, the myeloblast, promyelocyte, myelocyte, metamyelocyte, the band or stab cell, which is the least mature form normally found in the peripheral blood, and the mature segmented (polymorphonuclear) granulocyte. Commitment to one of the granulocyte lines occurs in stem cells before the myeloblast stage is reached; thus there are distinct neutrophil, eosinophil, and basophil series; however, the morphologic stages are the same.
lymphocyte series (lymphocytic series) the succession of developing cells that ultimately culminates in mature lymphocytes. The morphologically distinguishable forms are lymphoblast, prolymphocyte, and lymphocyte.
monocyte series (monocytic series) the succession of developing cells that ultimately culminates in the monocyte. The morphologically distinguishable forms are monoblast, promonoblast, and monocyte.
plasmacyte series (plasmacytic series) a series of morphologically distinguishable cells that are stages in plasma cell development: in order of maturity, the plasmablast (an activated B cell usually referred to as a large lymphocyte or lymphoblast), proplasmacyte, and plasmacyte.
thrombocyte series (thrombocytic series) the succession of developing cells that ultimately culminates in platelets (thrombocytes). The morphologically distinct cell types are megakaryoblast, promegakaryocyte, and megakaryocyte, which fragments to form platelets.

ser·ies

, pl.

ser·ies

(sēr'ēz),
1. A succession of similar objects following one another in space or time.
2. In chemistry, a group of substances, either elements or compounds, having similar properties or differing from each other in composition by a constant ratio.
3. In diagnostic medicine, denotes a group of related tests adding up to an examination to either establish or rule out a given type of diagnosis.
[L. fr. sero, to join together]

series

/se·ries/ (se´rēz) a group or succession of events, objects, or substances arranged in regular order or forming a kind of chain; in electricity, parts of a circuit connected successively end to end to form a single path for the current.se´rial
erythrocytic series  the succession of morphologically distinguishable cells that are stages in erythrocyte development: proerythroblast, basophilic erythroblast, polychromatophilic erythroblast, orthochromatic erythroblast, reticulocyte, and erythrocyte.
granulocytic series  the succession of morphologically distinguishable cells that are stages in granulocyte development; there are distinct basophil, eosinophil, and neutrophil series but the morphological stages are the same.
lymphocytic series  a series of morphologically distinguishable cells once thought to represent stages in lymphocyte development; now known to represent various forms of mature lymphocytes.
monocytic series  the succession of developing cells that ultimately culminates in the monocyte.
thrombocytic series  the succession of developing cells that ultimately culminates in the blood platelets (thrombocytes).

series

[sir′ēs] pl. series
Etymology: L, in a row
a chain of objects or events arranged in a predictable order, such as the series of stages through which a mature blood cell develops.

series

Clinical series, series of consecutive cases Clinical research An uncontrolled study–prospective or retrospective of a series–succession of consecutive Pts who receive a particular intervention and are followed to observe outcomes. See Case series, Time series Imaging A set of images taken in a sequence. See Cardiac series, Lower GI series, Obstruction series.

ser·ies

, pl. series (sēr'ēz)
1. A succession of similar objects following one another in space or time.
2. chemistry A group of substances, either elements or compounds, having similar properties or differing from each other in composition by a constant ratio.
[L. fr. sero, to join together]

series

the sample available for taxonomic study.

ser·ies

, pl. series (sēr'ēz)
1. Succession of similar objects following one another in space or time.
2. In diagnostic medicine, denotes a group of related tests leading to examination to either establish or rule out a given diagnosis.
[L. fr. sero, to join together]

series

a group or succession of events, objects or substances arranged in regular order or forming a kind of chain; in electricity, parts of a circuit connected successively end to end to form a single path for the current.

erythrocytic series
the succession of developing cells that ultimately culminates in the erythrocyte. The morphologically distinguishable forms are pronormoblast (rubriblast), basophilic normoblast (prorubricyte), polychromatophilic normoblast (rubricyte), orthochromatic normoblast (metarubricyte), reticulocyte and erythrocyte.
granulocytic series
the succession of developing cells that ultimately culminates in mature granulocytes (neutrophils, eosinophils, or basophils). The morphologically distinguishable forms are myeloblast, promyelocyte (progranulocyte), myelocyte, metamyelocyte, band granulocyte and segmented granulocyte. Stem cells are committed to become either neutrophils or eosinophils before the myelocyte stage. This may also be true for basophils.
lymphocytic series
the succession of developing cells that ultimately culminates in mature lymphocytes. The morphologically distinguishable forms are lymphoblast, prolymphocyte and lymphocyte.
monocytic series
the succession of developing cells that ultimately culminates in the monocyte. The morphologically distinguishable forms are monoblast, promonoblast and monocyte.
thrombocytic series
the succession of developing cells that ultimately culminates in platelets (thrombocytes). The morphologically distinct cell types are megakaryoblast, promegakaryocyte and megakaryocyte, which fragment to form platelets.

Patient discussion about series

Q. How important is good nutrition in childhood? i saw a series about a girl that all she ever ate till the age of 14 was chocolat and chocolat only .. and she turned out just fine , now , chocolat is not consider as much as i know a good nutrition , but the fact is she is healthy and flourish ... so how important is a good nutrition ?

A. The almost 70 kg we gain during our development from birth to adulthood doesn’t come from the air, so essentially, we are pretty much what we eat… Nutrition is of utmost importance, both supplying the child with the essential nutrients for normal development (iron and B1 are essential for brain development, and lack of B12 may cause anemia which can harm growth), and avoidance of excessive unnecessary or harmful foods (i.e. too much calories, exposure to chemicals in foods etc.)

I haven’t seen this film so can’t really comment about it, but take into consideration that no one eats ONLY one food without eating anything else for 15 years. This girl might have eaten excessive amounts of chocolate, but probably not just it.

You may read more here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/nutrition.html

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