erythroblast


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Related to erythroblast: monoblast

erythroblast

 [ĕ-rith´ro-blast]
a term originally used for any type of nucleated erythrocyte, but now usually limited to one of the nucleated precursors of an erythrocyte, i.e. one of the developmental stages in the erythrocytic series, in contrast to a megaloblast. In this usage, it is called also normoblast.
basophilic erythroblast a nucleated precursor in the erythrocytic series, preceding the polychromatophilic erythroblast and following the proerythroblast; the cytoplasm is basophilic, the nucleus is large with clumped chromatin, and the nucleoli have disappeared. Called also basophilic normoblast.
orthochromatic erythroblast see normoblast.
polychromatic erythroblast (polychromatophilic erythroblast) see normoblast.

e·ryth·ro·blast

(ĕ-rith'rō-blast),
Originally, a term denoting all forms of human red blood cells containing a nucleus, both pathologic (that is, megaloblastic) and normal (for example, normoblastic). The pathologic or megaloblastic series is observed in pernicious anemia in relapse. The term megaloblast is also used to indicate the first generation of cells in the red blood cell series that can be distinguished morphologically; hence, with this usage, megaloblast denotes both a normal and an abnormal cell. In the erythroblastic series of maturation four stages of development can be recognized: 1) proerythroblast, 2) basophilic erythroblast, 3) polychromatic erythroblast, and 4) orthochromatic erythroblast. In the megaloblastic series of maturation, stages similar to those found in the normoblastic series are seen: 1) promegaloblast, 2) basophilic megaloblast, 3) polychromatic megaloblast, and 4) orthochromatic megaloblast. In the normal series of maturation, after loss of the nucleus, young erythrocytes are called reticulocytes; these cells may be recognized with supravital stains such as brilliant cresyl blue; ultimately the reticulocytes become erythrocytes, or mature red blood cells.
Synonym(s): erythrocytoblast
[erythro- + G. blastos, germ]

erythroblast

/eryth·ro·blast/ (ĕ-rith´ro-blast) originally, any nucleated erythrocyte, but now more generally used to designate a nucleated precursor cell in the erythrocytic series (q.v.). Four developmental stages in the series are recognized: the proerythroblast (q.v.), the basophilic e., in which the cytoplasm is basophilic, the nucleus is large with clumped chromatin, and the nucleoli have disappeared; the polychromatophilic e., in which the nuclear chromatin shows increased clumping and the cytoplasm begins to acquire hemoglobin and takes on an acidophilic tint; and the orthochromatic e., the final stage before nuclear loss, in which the nucleus is small and ultimately becomes a blue-black, homogeneous, structureless mass.

erythroblast

(ĭ-rĭth′rə-blăst′)
n.
Any of the nucleated cells normally found only in bone marrow that develop into erythrocytes.

e·ryth′ro·blas′tic adj.

erythroblast

[erith′rəblast′]
a nucleated immature form of a red blood cell found only in bone marrow.

e·ryth·ro·blast

(ĕ-rith'rō-blast)
The first generation of cells in the red blood cell series that can be distinguished from precursor endothelial cells. In normal maturation, four stages of development can be recognized: pronormoblast, basophilic normoblast, polychromatic normoblast, and orthochromatic normoblast.
[erythro- + G. blastos, germ]

erythroblast

A primitive, nucleated red blood cell. A stage in the development of the normal non-nucleated red cell (ERYTHROCYTE) found in the circulating blood.

erythroblast

a nucleated cell occurring in bone marrow as the first identifiable stage of red blood cell formation; See ERYTHROCYTE.

Loevit,

Moritz, Austrian pathologist, 1851-1918.
Loevit cell - originally a term denoting all forms of human red blood cells containing a nucleus, both pathologic and normal. Synonym(s): erythroblast

erythroblast

bone marrow precursor of an erythrocyte

e·ryth·ro·blast

(ĕ-rith'rō-blast)
The first generation of cells in the red blood cell series that can be distinguished from precursor endothelial cells.
[erythro- + G. blastos, germ]

erythroblast

originally, any nucleated erythrocyte, but now more generally used to designate the nucleated precursor from which an erythrocyte develops.

basophilic erythroblast
orthochromatic erythroblast
polychromatophilic erythroblast
References in periodicals archive ?
They found that selectively eliminating CD169-positive macrophages in mice reduces the number of bone marrow erythroblasts - evidence that these macrophages are indeed vital for the survival of erythroblasts, which develop into RBCs.
Pure red cell aplasia is a rare adverse event characterised by anaemia, low reticulocyte count, absence of erythroblasts, resistance to EPO and neutralising antibodies against EPO (109,110).
To the Editor: Bartonella are fastidious, aerobic, gram-negative, facultative, intracellular bacteria that infect erythrocytes, erythroblasts, endothelial cells, monocytes, and dendritic cells, and are transmitted by arthropod vectors or by animal scratches or bites (16).
Other features are a very low level of erythroblasts in a bone marrow aspirate (less than 5%), and a dramatic increase in serum ferritin, said Dr.
Cyclopamine inhibited the formation of erythroid colonies and delay ed the maturation of erythroblasts in erythroid colonies that did form.
Exportin 4, a Potential Amplifier of TGF-B Signaling, Is Increased in Primary Baboon Bone Marrow Erythroblasts Following Decitabine Treatment
Coming from a myelopoietic origin, red blood cells mature from erythroblasts and have a high turnover rate as they are exposed to severe mechanical stress during circulation (45).
GDF15 and TWSG1 are both BMP antagonists produced by erythroblasts and putative components of the erythroid regulator that can inhibit hepcidin expression in vitro.
6) In the subsequent revision of the FAB classification in 1985, (7) the criteria for the diagnosis of AML-M6 were refined to include the following: (1) erythroblasts that represent 50% or more of all nucleated bone marrow cells; (2) prominent dyserythropoiesis; (3) and myeloblasts that represent 30% or more of the nonerythroid cells in the bone marrow.
EPO is an erythroid specific growth factor that binds with erythroid progenitors to enhance the proliferation and differentiation of erythroblasts into reticulocytes.
Erythroblasts have dense, blue, immature cytoplasm and large nuclei with prominent nucleoli.
The hea mouse exhibits large numbers of peripheral erythroblasts.