error disclosure

error disclosure

Reporting to a patient that a mistake was made in the provision of his or her health care. It is a practice that is widely advocated by bioethicists but generally eschewed by practitioners because of fears of litigation or investigation. When surveyed, patients report wanting full disclosure of any errors made during their treatment. They prefer to hear how the error occurred, and how similar errors can be prevented. Finally, most patients want their practitioners to apologize or express regret about their errors.

Laws to encourage health care providers to disclose errors are known colloquially as “apology laws.” These laws encourage expressions of regret by exempting statements made in apology from legal action or liability.

References in periodicals archive ?
1784) to establish a National Medical Error Disclosure and Compensation Program (National MEDiC Act).
Liability claims and costs before and after implementation of a medical error disclosure program.
Nor is it conducive to bringing about the much-needed transformation of health care organizational cultures from "blame and shame" to ones that are more "fair and just," with more transparent systems for error disclosure, caregiver support and clinical process improvements.
and physician attitudes toward error disclosure, has also found that
A better understanding of what helps or hinders error disclosure could result in ways to address these three goals together as part of one unified process.
We use this case to discuss, from the laboratoriari s viewpoint, the ethical problems of error disclosure.
Chan et al reviewed the literature on error disclosure and surveyed patients about their information needs related to errors, and they developed a five-point framework for effective error disclosure.
The two senators recently touted the benefits of the bill, the National Medical Error Disclosure and Compensation Act (S.
Clear rules help make review, error disclosure and training a pleasure rather than a chore both for those who instruct and our trainees.
Gallagher reviews some of the ethical issues surrounding the disclosure of medical error and argues that a consensus regarding the minimum standard for error disclosure does not yet exist.
Banja, who directs the Section on Ethics in Research and Participant Advocacy of the Atlanta Clinical Translation Science Institute at Emory, will both comment on the current environment for error disclosure in research and entertain questions from the attendees at the Carter Center event that is open to the public.
Gallagher, the survey on error disclosure was sent to 2,000 physicians in Washington State and 2,000 Canadian physicians.