error


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error

 [er´or]
a defect or mistake in structure or function.
inborn error of metabolism a genetically determined biochemical disorder in which a specific enzyme defect produces a metabolic block that may have pathologic consequences at birth, as in phenylketonuria, or in later life.
measurement error the difference between what exists in reality and what is measured by a measurement method.
Type I error the rejection of a null hypothesis that is true.
Type II error acceptance of a null hypothesis that is false.

er·ror

(er'ōr),
1. A defect in structure or function.
2. In biostatistics: a mistaken decision, as in hypothesis testing or classification by a discriminant function; or the difference between the true value and the observed value of a variate, ascribed to randomness or misreading by an observer.
3. False-positive and false-negative results in a dichotomous trial.
4. A false or mistaken belief; in biomedical and other sciences, there are many varieties of error, for example, due to bias, inaccurate measurements, or faulty instruments.

er·ror

hamartophobia.

error

/er·ror/ (er´er) a defect in structure or function; a deviation.
inborn error of metabolism  a genetically determined biochemical disorder in which a specific enzyme defect causes a metabolic block that may have pathologic consequences at birth or in later life.

error

Etymology: L, errare, to wander
(in research) a defect in the design of a study, in the development of measurements or instruments, or in the interpretation of findings.
An unintentional deviation from standard operating procedures or practice guidelines
Lab medicine An erroneous result from a patient sample, the frequency of which reflects the lab’s QC procedures and adherence to well-designed procedure manuals
Medical journalism See Erratum
Medical malpractice See Honest error, Human error, Misadventure
Patient care The failure of a planned action to be completed as intended—error of execution—or the use of the wrong plan to achieve an aim—error of planning Psychology A technical term referring to random variability in research results
Statistics See Type I error, Type II error

error

An unintentional deviation from standard operating procedures or practice guidelines Lab medicine An erroneous result from a Pt sample, the frequency of which reflects the lab's QC procedures and adherence to well-designed procedure manuals Medtalk See Misadventure, Honest error, Human error Patient care The failure of a planned action to be completed as intended–error of execution or the use of the wrong plan to achieve an aim–error of planning Statistics see Type I error, Type II error Vox populi → medtalk Opportunity for improvement.

er·ror

(er'ŏr)
1. A defect in structure or function.
2. biostatistics A mistaken decision, as in hypothesis testing or classification by a discriminant function; or the difference between the true value and the observed value of a variate, ascribed to randomness or misreading by an observer.
3. A false or mistaken belief; in biomedical and other sciences, there are many varieties of error, for example due to bias, inaccurate measurements, or faulty instruments.

er·ror

(er'ŏr)
A defect in structure or function; a false or mistaken belief; in biomedical and other sciences, there are many varieties of error, for example, due to bias, inaccurate measurements, or faulty instruments.

error,

n a violation of duty; a fault; a mistake in the proceedings of a court in matters of law or of fact.
error, legal,
n a mistaken judgment or incorrect belief as to the existence or effect of matters of fact, or a false or mistaken conception or application of the law.
error, numerical,
n the amount of loss or precision in a quantity; the difference between an accurate quantity and its calculated approximation. Errors occur in numerical methods; mistakes occur in programming, coding, data transcription, and operating; malfunctions occur in computers and are caused by physical limitations of the properties of materials.
error of measurement,
n the deviation of an individual score or observation from its true value, caused by the unreliability of the instrument and the individual who is measuring.
error, sampling,
n any mistake in drawing a sample that keeps it from being unrepresentative; selection procedures that are biased; error introduced when a group is described on the basis of an unrepresentative sample.
error, variance,
n that part of the total variance caused by anything irrelevant to a study that cannot be experimentally controlled.

error

the wrong answer in an experiment or result to a questionnaire.

experimental error
of two types, errors of objectivity when the experimenter knows the groups and the expected result, and errors of detection or measurement due to inadequate technique or the uneven application of measuring techniques.
random error
error which occurs due to chance, such as sampling error.
sampling error
one due to the fact that the result obtained from a sample is only an estimate of that obtained from using the entire population.
systematic error
when the error is applied to all results, i.e. those due to bias.
error types I and II
in making a statistical test, you can reject the null hypothesis when it is true (type I) or accept the null hypothesis when it is false (type II).

Patient discussion about error

Q. My husband takes Zocor (20mg) for his hyperlipidemia. by mistake he took 3 pills (60mg). What to do? My husband suffers from high blood lipids and he is treated with Zocor (Simvastatin). he should take one pill of 20 mg per day. By accident he took 3 pills (60mg) in one day. what to do?

A. You need to call your GP. Zocor doses are between 20-80 mg but maybe your husband has other problems (mainly in his kidneys) that will interfere with the normal way of cleaning the body from the drug.
Zocor overdose symptoms will be myalgia and red urine (in a severe overdose) if your husband have one of those symptoms go to the ER as soon as possible.

More discussions about error
References in classic literature ?
To the historian it bristles with errors--not errors of fact, but errors of interpretation.
Still, while these principles were being rapidly disseminated many errors and illusory fears proved less easy to eradicate.
But in time the majority renounced these vulgar errors, and espoused the true side of the question.
So, in any case, suicide seemed to me to be an unpardonable error, even in the man who, through a false conception of greatness of soul, takes his life a few moments before the executioner's axe falls.
Whether such doctrines as are attributed to him by Plato were really held either by him or by any other Sophist is uncertain; in the infancy of philosophy serious errors about morality might easily grow up-- they are certainly put into the mouths of speakers in Thucydides; but we are concerned at present with Plato's description of him, and not with the historical reality.
Let it not be imagined, however, that I consider myself competent to reform the errors and abuses of society, but only that I would fain contribute my humble quota towards so good an aim; and if I can gain the public ear at all, I would rather whisper a few wholesome truths therein than much soft nonsense.
And that is why I can triumph over your error and your merely animal intelligence, Frederic Larsan.
Even this, however, does not remove the practical risk of error, since we may mistakenly believe it self-evident that a certain belief is self-evident.
Yet though there is a great difference between our manners, customs, civil government, and those of the Abyssins, there is yet a much greater in points of faith; for so many errors have been introduced and ingrafted into their religion, by their ignorance, their separation from the Catholic Church, and their intercourse with Jews, Pagans, and Mohammedans, that their present religion is nothing but a kind of confused miscellany of Jewish and Mohammedan superstitions, with which they have corrupted those remnants of Christianity which they still retain.
If my poor Flatland friend retained the vigour of mind which he enjoyed when he began to compose these Memoirs, I should not now need to represent him in this preface, in which he desires, firstly, to return his thanks to his readers and critics in Spaceland, whose appreciation has, with unexpected celerity, required a second edition of his work; secondly, to apologize for certain errors and misprints (for which, however, he is not entirely responsible); and, thirdly, to explain one or two misconceptions.
First, errors of observation, concerning the distance of the projectile from the surface of the moon, for on the 11th of December it was impossible to see it; and what Joseph T.
These apparent errors in the doctrine of Thwackum served greatly to palliate the contrary errors in that of Square, which our good man no less saw and condemned.