eroticism

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erotism

 [er´o-tizm]
a sexual instinct or desire; the expression of one's instinctual energy or drive, especially the sex drive.
anal erotism in psychoanalytic theory, fixation of libido at (or regression to) the anal phase of infantile development, producing egotistic, dogmatic, stubborn, miserly character.
genital erotism in psychoanalytic theory, achievement and maintenance of libido at the genital phase of psychosexual development, permitting acceptance of normal adult relationships and responsibilities.
oral erotism in psychoanalytic theory, fixation of libido at (or regression to) the oral phase of infantile development, producing passive, insecure, sensitive character.

er·o·tism

, eroticism (er'ō-tizm, ĕ-rot'i-sizm),
A condition of sexual excitement.

eroticism

(ĭ-rŏt′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
The quality of being erotic or being represented as erotic.

e·rot′i·cist n.

eroticism

[irot′isiz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, erotikos, sexual love
1 sexual impulse or desire.
2 the arousal or attempt to arouse the sexual instinct through suggestive or symbolic means.
3 the expression of sexual instinct or desire.
4 an abnormally persistent sexual drive. Also called erotism. See also anal eroticism, oral eroticism.

eroticism

Erotism Sexology Personal experience and expression of one's genital arousal and functioning as ♂ or ♀, alone or with a partner, vis-á-vis arousing ideation, imagery, and sensory input. See Pornography, Sexuality.

eroticism

1. The elements in thought, pictorial imagery or literature which tend to arouse sexual excitement or desire.
2. Actual sexual arousal.
3. A greater than average disposition for sex and all its manifestations.
4. Sexual interest or excitement prompted by contemplation, or stimulation, of areas of the body not normally associated with sexuality. The terms anal and oral eroticism are used in two senses-in reference to adult physical sexual activity and in a theoretical Freudian psychoanalytic sense.