erosion

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erosion

 [e-ro´zhun]
an eating or gnawing away; a shallow or superficial ulceration; in dentistry, the wasting away or loss of substance of a tooth by a chemical process that does not involve known bacterial action. adj., adj ero´sive.
cervical erosion destruction of the squamous epithelium of the vaginal portion of the cervix, due to irritation and later ulceration.

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn),
1. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure. Compare: corrosion.
2. A shallow ulcer; in the stomach and intestine, an ulcer limited to the mucosa, with no penetration of the muscularis mucosa.
3. Chemically induced tooth loss, occurring mainly through acid dissolution. When the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion. Synonym(s): odontolysis
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]

erosion

/ero·sion/ (ĕ-ro´zhun) an eating or gnawing away; a shallow or superficial ulceration; in dentistry, the wasting away or loss of substance of a tooth by a chemical process that does not involve known bacterial action.ero´sive

erosion

(ĭ-rō′zhən)
n.
The superficial destruction of a surface by friction, pressure, ulceration, or trauma.

erosive (ĭ-rō′sĭv) adj.

erosion

[irō′zhən]
Etymology: L, erodere, to consume
1 the wearing away or gradual destruction of a surface. For example, a mucosal or epidermal surface may erode as a result of inflammation, injury, or other causes, usually marked by the appearance of an ulcer. See also necrosis.
2 the action of acid (low pH) substances dissolving tooth structure. Can be due to habitual sucking on citrus fruits such as lemons, from acidic swimming pool water, or gastroesophageal reflux.

erosion

A wearing away, ulceration. See Apple core erosion, Cervical erosion.

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn)
1. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure.
2. A shallow ulcer; in the stomach and intestine, an ulcer limited to the mucosa, with no penetration of the muscularis mucosae.
3. The wearing away of a tooth by nonbacterial chemical action; when the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion.
Synonym(s): odontolysis.
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]

erosion

the wearing away of geological formations such as rock, soil, etc. For example, deafforestation or the removal of hedges causes soil erosion.

erosion

wearing away, by friction or pressure

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn)
1. Chemically induced tooth loss, occurring mainly through acid dissolution. When the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion.
Synonym(s): odontolysis.
2. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure.
Compare: corrosion
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]

erosion (ērō´zhən),

n the chemical or mechanicochemical destruction of tooth substance, the mechanism of which is incompletely known, which leads to the creation of concavities of many shapes at the cementoenamel junction of teeth. The surface of the cavity, unlike dental caries, is hard and smooth.
Enlarge picture
Erosion.

erosion

an eating or gnawing away; a shallow or superficial ulceration; in dentistry, the wasting away or loss of substance of a tooth by a chemical process that does not involve known bacterial action.
References in periodicals archive ?
For bladder or urethral erosion, avoid urethral dilation, which can loosen the sling, but which also places the sling closer to the urethra thereby increasing the potential for more erosion, Dr.
If a patient treated for bladder or urethral erosion presents with recurrent irritating voiding symptoms, be sure to evaluate the contralateral side for a second erosion, she said.
The opinion that cavitation erosion is mostly a mechanic phenomena is sustained also by following experimental results (Franc & Michel 2004):
For a pertinent analyze in order to justify the necessity of approaching cavitation erosion as a mechanical process, in figure1 and 2 were shown Bordeasu results on various materials probes tested in TMHL on magnetostrictive vibratory apparatus with nickel tube (Bordeasu et al.
The extent of erosion was limited, grade A in about 34%, grade B in 41%, grade C in 9%, and the most extensive erosion, grade D, in about 2% of patients, reported Dr.
The mechanism by which chronic cocaine abuse causes local necrosis of external structures is thought to involve many different factors, including ischemia from vasospasm, caustic erosion by adulterants, and local superinfection.
Much of the erosion repair work consisted of placing soil and rock on the waterside of the levee.
There were no erosions in 37 women who underwent concurrent supracervical hysterectomy or in 35 women who had a previous total abdominal hysterectomy and then underwent sacral suspension alone, said Dr.