erosion

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erosion

 [e-ro´zhun]
an eating or gnawing away; a shallow or superficial ulceration; in dentistry, the wasting away or loss of substance of a tooth by a chemical process that does not involve known bacterial action. adj., adj ero´sive.
cervical erosion destruction of the squamous epithelium of the vaginal portion of the cervix, due to irritation and later ulceration.

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn),
1. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure. Compare: corrosion.
2. A shallow ulcer; in the stomach and intestine, an ulcer limited to the mucosa, with no penetration of the muscularis mucosa.
3. Chemically induced tooth loss, occurring mainly through acid dissolution. When the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion. Synonym(s): odontolysis
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]

erosion

/ero·sion/ (ĕ-ro´zhun) an eating or gnawing away; a shallow or superficial ulceration; in dentistry, the wasting away or loss of substance of a tooth by a chemical process that does not involve known bacterial action.ero´sive

erosion

(ĭ-rō′zhən)
n.
The superficial destruction of a surface by friction, pressure, ulceration, or trauma.

erosive (ĭ-rō′sĭv) adj.

erosion

[irō′zhən]
Etymology: L, erodere, to consume
1 the wearing away or gradual destruction of a surface. For example, a mucosal or epidermal surface may erode as a result of inflammation, injury, or other causes, usually marked by the appearance of an ulcer. See also necrosis.
2 the action of acid (low pH) substances dissolving tooth structure. Can be due to habitual sucking on citrus fruits such as lemons, from acidic swimming pool water, or gastroesophageal reflux.

erosion

A wearing away, ulceration. See Apple core erosion, Cervical erosion.

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn)
1. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure.
2. A shallow ulcer; in the stomach and intestine, an ulcer limited to the mucosa, with no penetration of the muscularis mucosae.
3. The wearing away of a tooth by nonbacterial chemical action; when the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion.
Synonym(s): odontolysis.
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]

erosion

the wearing away of geological formations such as rock, soil, etc. For example, deafforestation or the removal of hedges causes soil erosion.

erosion

wearing away, by friction or pressure

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn)
1. Chemically induced tooth loss, occurring mainly through acid dissolution. When the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion.
Synonym(s): odontolysis.
2. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure.
Compare: corrosion
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]

erosion (ērō´zhən),

n the chemical or mechanicochemical destruction of tooth substance, the mechanism of which is incompletely known, which leads to the creation of concavities of many shapes at the cementoenamel junction of teeth. The surface of the cavity, unlike dental caries, is hard and smooth.
Enlarge picture
Erosion.

erosion

an eating or gnawing away; a shallow or superficial ulceration; in dentistry, the wasting away or loss of substance of a tooth by a chemical process that does not involve known bacterial action.
References in periodicals archive ?
137]Cs percentage residuals between the strong and weak erosional areas (Table 1).
No one has considered the possibility of erosional origin for the linear dunes on Titan.
Character of erosional landslide processes in the region of the large meanders of the Nemunas river.
The mainly erosional status of the edge of the low marsh was confirmed in 2008 by an instrument survey of ten transects (Fig.
Mountain--front sinuosity is an index that reflects the balance between erosional forces that tend to cut embayment into a mountain front and tectonic forces that tend to produce a straight mountain front coincident with active range-boundary fault.
was found reduced and truncated against the erosional channel surface
The Lithuanian coast (nearshore and coastal zone) character of the eastern shore of the Baltic Sea is ranging from erosional to the accumulative types (Grigelis 1996).
These landform classes were cross-validated and further combined with the drainage network to identify the possible depositional and erosional areas for each catchment.
hardgrounds, erosional surfaces, major lithofacies offsets), as well as faunal epiboles in closely spaced outcrops along both sides of the Cincinnati Arch and 2) this interval extends laterally from desiccation-cracked, shaly facies to nodular, fossiliferous facies representing environments below normal wave-base that have been previously examined for microendoliths, traces of light-sensitive endolithic cyanobacteria and green and red algae (Vogel & Brett 2009).
This new study supports an alternative hypothesis that persistent warm water was confined to the subsurface and many erosional features were carved during brief periods when liquid water was stable at the surface.
The name Leonard comes from Malott's reference to an erosional steephead with limestone springs (Malott,1952).
The Surprise Canyon Formation consists of sandstone, siltstone, conglomerate, and carbonate rock filling erosional valleys and karst features (e.