erosion


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Related to erosion: Wind erosion, soil erosion

erosion

 [e-ro´zhun]
an eating or gnawing away; a shallow or superficial ulceration; in dentistry, the wasting away or loss of substance of a tooth by a chemical process that does not involve known bacterial action. adj., adj ero´sive.
cervical erosion destruction of the squamous epithelium of the vaginal portion of the cervix, due to irritation and later ulceration.

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn),
1. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure. Compare: corrosion.
2. A shallow ulcer; in the stomach and intestine, an ulcer limited to the mucosa, with no penetration of the muscularis mucosa.
3. Chemically induced tooth loss, occurring mainly through acid dissolution. When the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion. Synonym(s): odontolysis
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]

erosion

/ero·sion/ (ĕ-ro´zhun) an eating or gnawing away; a shallow or superficial ulceration; in dentistry, the wasting away or loss of substance of a tooth by a chemical process that does not involve known bacterial action.ero´sive

erosion

(ĭ-rō′zhən)
n.
The superficial destruction of a surface by friction, pressure, ulceration, or trauma.

erosive (ĭ-rō′sĭv) adj.

erosion

[irō′zhən]
Etymology: L, erodere, to consume
1 the wearing away or gradual destruction of a surface. For example, a mucosal or epidermal surface may erode as a result of inflammation, injury, or other causes, usually marked by the appearance of an ulcer. See also necrosis.
2 the action of acid (low pH) substances dissolving tooth structure. Can be due to habitual sucking on citrus fruits such as lemons, from acidic swimming pool water, or gastroesophageal reflux.

erosion

A wearing away, ulceration. See Apple core erosion, Cervical erosion.

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn)
1. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure.
2. A shallow ulcer; in the stomach and intestine, an ulcer limited to the mucosa, with no penetration of the muscularis mucosae.
3. The wearing away of a tooth by nonbacterial chemical action; when the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion.
Synonym(s): odontolysis.
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]

erosion

the wearing away of geological formations such as rock, soil, etc. For example, deafforestation or the removal of hedges causes soil erosion.

erosion

wearing away, by friction or pressure

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn)
1. Chemically induced tooth loss, occurring mainly through acid dissolution. When the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion.
Synonym(s): odontolysis.
2. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure.
Compare: corrosion
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]

erosion (ērō´zhən),

n the chemical or mechanicochemical destruction of tooth substance, the mechanism of which is incompletely known, which leads to the creation of concavities of many shapes at the cementoenamel junction of teeth. The surface of the cavity, unlike dental caries, is hard and smooth.
Enlarge picture
Erosion.

erosion

an eating or gnawing away; a shallow or superficial ulceration; in dentistry, the wasting away or loss of substance of a tooth by a chemical process that does not involve known bacterial action.
References in periodicals archive ?
All other factors being equal, it has been established that erosion rates increase as slope angles increase; presumably as overland flow velocities increase, so does the erosive power and transport capacity of runoff to carry suspended sediments.
Every conservation plan written by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service has been based on soil erosion calculations derived from USLE or its successors, the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) and version 2 (RUSLE2).
In order to prepare the erosion plan and to evaluate the produced sediment in the aquifer basin of Ilam dam the required basic maps are prepared.
The Newport AM explained that the national strategy would have four key objectives, and set the "overarching framework for a holistic flood and coastal erosion risk management system".
There is extensive information on dental erosion, its prevalence and associated dietary risk factors in industrialised countries.
The GLO depends on the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department for most of the funding for coastal erosion projects.
2007; Sanderman and Chappell 2013), particularly by wind erosion and dust emission (Chappell et al.
Further, it may take only as few as four of these items per day to increase the risk of Acid Erosion.
associate professor in the University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Dentistry in Lincoln, has seen an increase in the number of dental patients with erosion of the tooth enamel - the protective layer of the tooth.
Patients with vaginal mesh erosion might also note that their partner "feels something" in the vagina during intercourse.
Acid erosion is the wear to tooth enamel caused by the modern lifestyle which threatens the teeth of both men and women of all ages.
Their findings suggest that, on average, tillage in areas prone to ephemeral gully erosion can produce significantly higher soil erosion rates compared to those same regions under no-till management practices.