erode

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e·rode

(ē-rōd'),
1. To cause, or to be affected by, erosion.
2. To remove by ulceration.
[L. erodo, to gnaw away]

e·rode

(ē-rōd')
1. To cause, or to be affected by, erosion.
2. To remove by ulceration.
[L. erodo, to gnaw away]

erode

(ē-rōd′) [L. erodere]
1. To wear away.
2. To eat away by ulceration.

e·rode

(ē-rōd')
1. To cause, or to be affected by, erosion.
2. To remove by ulceration.
[L. erodo, to gnaw away]
References in periodicals archive ?
The modified mass loss by immersion test (Pi), also called specific erodibility test, provides a quantitative assessment of the potential breakdown of undisturbed soil samples when submerged in water.
Partitioning total erosion on paved roads into splash and hydraulic components: The roles of interstorm surface preparation and dynamic erodibility.
Soil erodibility map for Rawal watershed is produced by overlay analysis of soil texture, depth and stoniness.
Planners originally considered using soil erodibility as a stand-alone criterion; Greenprints participants were concerned that there was too much overlap between erodibility and runoff potential.
Rill erosion is a function of the flow rate or hydraulic shear [tau] of the water flowing in the rill, the soil's rill erodibility [K.
It reflects the influence of soil structure and texture on the erodibility of soil.
An investigation on erodibility properties of soils which developed on different parent materials in K.
Land planners could use this information to prepare use maps based on erodibility.
The spacing of grade control structures will vary depending on stream gradient, streambed erodibility, and variations in bed and bank conditions influencing constructability.
An erodibility index method for determining the limiting scour depths in resistant soil layers was the topic of a technical paper that was presented at the annual meeting of the Transportation Research Board held in Washington, D.
The USDA also noted that "the average quality of the land converted to cropland between 1995 and 1997 was generally lower, with a steeper slope and more erodibility, than the average quality of the land already being used for cropland.