erode

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e·rode

(ē-rōd'),
1. To cause, or to be affected by, erosion.
2. To remove by ulceration.
[L. erodo, to gnaw away]

e·rode

(ē-rōd')
1. To cause, or to be affected by, erosion.
2. To remove by ulceration.
[L. erodo, to gnaw away]

erode

(ē-rōd′) [L. erodere]
1. To wear away.
2. To eat away by ulceration.

e·rode

(ē-rōd')
1. To cause, or to be affected by, erosion.
2. To remove by ulceration.
[L. erodo, to gnaw away]
References in periodicals archive ?
Rosewell CJ, Loch RJ (2002) Estimation of the RUSLE soil erodibility factor.
The erodibility factor (K) is determined from the soil type, and the management and practices factors (C and P) are estimated from tables of values associated with management and practice descriptions.
The positive directions of the x- and v-axes can explain the degree of soil erodibility and amendment with zeolite, respectively, since the gathering scatter of AZ contents and CEC, and SL and SC were distributed on the positive x- and y-axes, respectively (Fig.
Dangler EW, EI-Swaify SA, Ahuja LR, Barnett AP (1976) Erodibility of selected Hawaii soils by rainfall simulation.
These grazing erosion trials, other than Carroll (2004), did not include bare plots that can be used to define soil erodibility.
These results suggest that soil erodibility is higher in winter (by a factor of 2-3), which is consistent with the results from the small rainfall simulator and earlier studies (Elliott et al.
1987) Cummings (1981) 12 a varies from 25 to 125, b is a soil specific constant related to erodibility Foster (1982) 13 For short slopes and or interill only Singer and Blackard (1982) 14 Contra Costa soil Singer and Blackard (1982) 15 Hillgate soil Stein (1983) 16 Ayrshire none, Amax Coal.
The rainfall erodibility factor (R) is a key factor influencing soil erosion as it contributes 50-70% of soil erosion in the TGRA (Duet al.
Diaz-Fierros F, Benito E, Soto B (1994) Action of forest fires on vegetation cover and soil erodibility.
Burning of pasture is commonly practised in many parts of the world for its perceived ability to improve pasture quality and palatability, reduce woody shrubs, control weeds, and increase nutrient supply (see for example Svejcar 1989; Orr and Paton 1997) However, burning is known to affect soil erodibility and runoff quality (DeBano et al.
This study was conducted to investigate temporal variations in rill erodibility of concentrated flow erosion, and to quantify the potential effects of root density on seasonal changes in rill erodibility using undisturbed soil samples taken from switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.