ergonomics

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Related to ergonomists: ergonomic, Ergonomy

er·go·nom·ics

(er'gō-nom'iks),
A branch of ecology concerned with human factors in the design and operation of machines and the physical environment.
[ergo- + G. nomos, law]

ergonomics

/er·go·nom·ics/ (er″go-nom´iks) the science relating to humans and their work, including the factors affecting the efficient use of human energy.

ergonomics

[ur′gōnom′iks]
Etymology: Gk, ergon, work, nomos, law
a scientific discipline devoted to the study and analysis of human work, especially as it is affected by individual anatomical, psychological, and other human characteristics. ergonomic, adj.

ergonomics

The formal study of the work environment, which evaluates and, if necessary, reconfigures a workplace by taking into account the anatomic, physiological and psychological variables of those working in the environment.

ergonomics

Occupation medicine The formal study of work situations, which attempts to evaluate, and if necessary, reconfigure a workplace by taking into account the anatomic and psychological variables of those working in the environment. See Ergogenic engineering, Human factor.

er·go·nom·ics

(ĕr'gŏ-nom'iks)
The science of workplace, tools, and equipment designed to reduce worker discomfort, strain, and fatigue and to prevent work-related injuries.
The science of workplace, tools, and equipment designed to reduce worker discomfort, strain, and fatigue and to prevent work-related injuries.
[ergo- + G. nomos, law]

ergonomics

The scientific study of humans in relation to their working environment and the application of science to improve working conditions. The increasing application of complex technology has resulted in increasing human discomfort, difficulties and dangers. Ergonomics seeks to solve such problems.

ergonomics (er·g·nˑ·miks),

n applied study of psychology, anatomy, and physiology relating to people and work environments; includes introduction of biomechanically suppor-tive equipment.

er·go·nom·ics

(ĕr'gŏ-nom'iks)
The science of workplace, tools, and equipment designed to reduce worker discomfort, strain, and fatigue and to prevent work-related injuries.
[ergo- + G. nomos, law]

ergonomics

the science of relating the physiological and anatomical characteristics of the working or racing animal to the physical aspects of its working environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
It's often helpful if an EA professional or someone else within an organization can identify weak spots--the areas where complaints are high and morale is low or where a lot of repetitive work is being performed--and steer an ergonomist toward those areas first.
When ergonomists are called upon to fix a product that has already been sent to the market and has failed, costs will escalate.
Common CTDs, such as backache, carpal-tunnel syndrome, tendonitis, and everyday strains and sprains bring on fatigue and overexertion, which can ultimately lead to lower worker productivity and even lost workdays, says Ken Thomas, an ergonomist at Wausau Insurance Companies, Worcester, Mass.
It does cost money," says private Portland ergonomist Steve Russell.
Messing, a biologist and ergonomist, questions the methods used to conduct gender inclusive research in occupational health.
The second type teaches middle managers responsible for workers' compensation how to prevent future claims from their area of expertise (the type of consultant you hire, be it an ergonomist, safety engineer, lawyer, or insurance auditor, defines the type of analysis you receive).
We got ergonomists to evaluate these stands to figure out why the incidence of injury is so high with laser scanners," she said.
That analysis is led by a certified and independent ergonomist.
This Framework Agreement is to establish for the public health establishment Grenoble University Hospital, the terms governing contracts concluded on its basis, hereinafter "subsequent Markets" to go for continuing education benefits " re-education "of the therapist staff (physiotherapists, ergonomists, therapists, orthoptists, orthotists, speech therapists, dieticians).
As ergonomists and usability specialists, we were particularly impressed with how Ergopoint uses ergonomic principles to empower the user and how easy it is to use.
We, as ergonomists in developing countries, need to work together to continue the research we are doing in our countries but we also need to make every effort to make our research more accessible to our people.