ergonomics

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er·go·nom·ics

(er'gō-nom'iks),
A branch of ecology concerned with human factors in the design and operation of machines and the physical environment.
[ergo- + G. nomos, law]

ergonomics

/er·go·nom·ics/ (er″go-nom´iks) the science relating to humans and their work, including the factors affecting the efficient use of human energy.

ergonomics

[ur′gōnom′iks]
Etymology: Gk, ergon, work, nomos, law
a scientific discipline devoted to the study and analysis of human work, especially as it is affected by individual anatomical, psychological, and other human characteristics. ergonomic, adj.

ergonomics

The formal study of the work environment, which evaluates and, if necessary, reconfigures a workplace by taking into account the anatomic, physiological and psychological variables of those working in the environment.

ergonomics

Occupation medicine The formal study of work situations, which attempts to evaluate, and if necessary, reconfigure a workplace by taking into account the anatomic and psychological variables of those working in the environment. See Ergogenic engineering, Human factor.

er·go·nom·ics

(ĕr'gŏ-nom'iks)
The science of workplace, tools, and equipment designed to reduce worker discomfort, strain, and fatigue and to prevent work-related injuries.
The science of workplace, tools, and equipment designed to reduce worker discomfort, strain, and fatigue and to prevent work-related injuries.
[ergo- + G. nomos, law]

ergonomics

The scientific study of humans in relation to their working environment and the application of science to improve working conditions. The increasing application of complex technology has resulted in increasing human discomfort, difficulties and dangers. Ergonomics seeks to solve such problems.

ergonomics (er·g·nˑ·miks),

n applied study of psychology, anatomy, and physiology relating to people and work environments; includes introduction of biomechanically suppor-tive equipment.

er·go·nom·ics

(ĕr'gŏ-nom'iks)
The science of workplace, tools, and equipment designed to reduce worker discomfort, strain, and fatigue and to prevent work-related injuries.
[ergo- + G. nomos, law]

ergonomics

the science of relating the physiological and anatomical characteristics of the working or racing animal to the physical aspects of its working environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on answer, respond accordingly, including the following:] The job of the plant ergonomist is to make sure that the workstation setup is such that the employee is not at risk of developing an injury over time.
An ergonomist may also conduct Symptom surveys that gather perceptions from workers about job tasks and workspace design.
Interviews with equipment suppliers, ergonomists, government officials, and plastics processors identified five basic types of equipment that create ergonomic harmony between the worker and the work.
That's pretty specific and already in the code," says state ergonomist Steve Morrissey.
The 23 contributing authors represent numerous disciplines: biologists, economists, ergonomists, epidemiologists, lawyers, nurses, occupational health practitioners, and sociologists.
Daniel McCrobie, a corporate ergonomist at Honeywell Inc.
The second type teaches middle managers responsible for workers' compensation how to prevent future claims from their area of expertise (the type of consultant you hire, be it an ergonomist, safety engineer, lawyer, or insurance auditor, defines the type of analysis you receive).
Berkowitz said the union would be willing to help retailers trying to find an ergonomist, and warned that "a lot of people hanging out shingles are old company safety directors who don't really know what they're doing.
That analysis is led by a certified and independent ergonomist.
We have more than 20,000 policyholders across the Eastern Seaboard, and as MEMIC's chief ergonomist I see the impact of poor workspace design on the bodies of employees and the bottom lines of companies as productivity decreases and healthcare and insurance costs -- including workers' compensation costs -- rise.
Ergonomist, physical therapist, doctors and employers all agree that moving from a sedentary seated only work station to providing employees the ability to both sit and stand while at work helps prevent work related injuries and increases employee performance.
Experienced risk assessment professionals Ostrom (certified professional ergonomist and safety professional) and Wilhelmsen (assistant professor, APUS/AMU, and NASA aviation inspection consultant) provide a practical and accessible how-to-guide for conducting risk assessments and understanding how and when to use the available tools.