ergonomics


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er·go·nom·ics

(er'gō-nom'iks),
A branch of ecology concerned with human factors in the design and operation of machines and the physical environment.
[ergo- + G. nomos, law]

ergonomics

/er·go·nom·ics/ (er″go-nom´iks) the science relating to humans and their work, including the factors affecting the efficient use of human energy.

ergonomics

[ur′gōnom′iks]
Etymology: Gk, ergon, work, nomos, law
a scientific discipline devoted to the study and analysis of human work, especially as it is affected by individual anatomical, psychological, and other human characteristics. ergonomic, adj.

ergonomics

The formal study of the work environment, which evaluates and, if necessary, reconfigures a workplace by taking into account the anatomic, physiological and psychological variables of those working in the environment.

ergonomics

Occupation medicine The formal study of work situations, which attempts to evaluate, and if necessary, reconfigure a workplace by taking into account the anatomic and psychological variables of those working in the environment. See Ergogenic engineering, Human factor.

er·go·nom·ics

(ĕr'gŏ-nom'iks)
The science of workplace, tools, and equipment designed to reduce worker discomfort, strain, and fatigue and to prevent work-related injuries.
The science of workplace, tools, and equipment designed to reduce worker discomfort, strain, and fatigue and to prevent work-related injuries.
[ergo- + G. nomos, law]

ergonomics

The scientific study of humans in relation to their working environment and the application of science to improve working conditions. The increasing application of complex technology has resulted in increasing human discomfort, difficulties and dangers. Ergonomics seeks to solve such problems.

ergonomics (er·g·nˑ·miks),

n applied study of psychology, anatomy, and physiology relating to people and work environments; includes introduction of biomechanically suppor-tive equipment.

er·go·nom·ics

(ĕr'gŏ-nom'iks)
The science of workplace, tools, and equipment designed to reduce worker discomfort, strain, and fatigue and to prevent work-related injuries.
[ergo- + G. nomos, law]

ergonomics

the science of relating the physiological and anatomical characteristics of the working or racing animal to the physical aspects of its working environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that ergonomics remains a costly issue for businesses, as these types of injuries account for one-third of days-away-from-work cases.
Butwid: We are working with the Ergonomics Center of North Carolina to develop a two-hour training package that will help EASE members, manufacturers of ergonomics equipment and dealers to train their sales forces to be better ergonomics consultants with customers.
I: The goal of the human factors and ergonomics discipline is to optimize human well-being and overall system effectiveness simultaneously.
Atlas Ergonomics provides turnkey support through the nation's largest network of ergonomic service providers or can assist corporate resources with the necessary training and technology.
Sawyer and Penman (2011) conducted educational sessions with year 10 students that included information on disorders associated with computer use, the warning signs to look for, principles of ergonomics to apply, software available to remind, with demonstration and return demonstration.
On a more personal note Hal was most supportive when the Rhodes Department moved to making ergonomics its prime focus, and over the years at many a conference he has always shown an interest in the development of ergonomics in SA, respecting our challenging research, particularly in the field, and emphasising the urgent need for practical application within all working environments, both formal and informal.
In developed countries, where the effectiveness of human labor are achieved through an Ergonomics program that allows solving problems systematically and simultaneously focuses on workers' health and cost benefits (Hatiar K.
If your firm is large, form an ergonomics committee to ask employees or the human resources department about any physical issues that have arisen and to research what type of ergonomics program is best.
Many of us will be familiar with non-application of ergonomics through ailments such as backache or repetitive strain injury.
The research institute couples this with office ergonomics training to help employees understand how to set up their workstations, take rest breaks, get up and stretch, and try to have some sense of control over that physical environment, Robertson said.
Noy, for one, expects the alliance will help his group spread information on ergonomics to its members, which will reduce the likelihood of OSHA inspectors showing up on their doorsteps.