ergonomics


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

er·go·nom·ics

(er'gō-nom'iks),
A branch of ecology concerned with human factors in the design and operation of machines and the physical environment.
[ergo- + G. nomos, law]

ergonomics

/er·go·nom·ics/ (er″go-nom´iks) the science relating to humans and their work, including the factors affecting the efficient use of human energy.

ergonomics

[ur′gōnom′iks]
Etymology: Gk, ergon, work, nomos, law
a scientific discipline devoted to the study and analysis of human work, especially as it is affected by individual anatomical, psychological, and other human characteristics. ergonomic, adj.

ergonomics

The formal study of the work environment, which evaluates and, if necessary, reconfigures a workplace by taking into account the anatomic, physiological and psychological variables of those working in the environment.

ergonomics

Occupation medicine The formal study of work situations, which attempts to evaluate, and if necessary, reconfigure a workplace by taking into account the anatomic and psychological variables of those working in the environment. See Ergogenic engineering, Human factor.

er·go·nom·ics

(ĕr'gŏ-nom'iks)
The science of workplace, tools, and equipment designed to reduce worker discomfort, strain, and fatigue and to prevent work-related injuries.
The science of workplace, tools, and equipment designed to reduce worker discomfort, strain, and fatigue and to prevent work-related injuries.
[ergo- + G. nomos, law]

ergonomics

The scientific study of humans in relation to their working environment and the application of science to improve working conditions. The increasing application of complex technology has resulted in increasing human discomfort, difficulties and dangers. Ergonomics seeks to solve such problems.

ergonomics (er·g·nˑ·miks),

n applied study of psychology, anatomy, and physiology relating to people and work environments; includes introduction of biomechanically suppor-tive equipment.

er·go·nom·ics

(ĕr'gŏ-nom'iks)
The science of workplace, tools, and equipment designed to reduce worker discomfort, strain, and fatigue and to prevent work-related injuries.
[ergo- + G. nomos, law]

ergonomics

the science of relating the physiological and anatomical characteristics of the working or racing animal to the physical aspects of its working environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Workrite Ergonomics was founded in 1991 and is an internationally recognized industry leader in the design, manufacture and distribution of height-adjustable workcenters and ergonomic office accessories, including adjustable keyboard platform systems and flat panel monitor support systems, and task lighting.
8220;These two case studies prove that effective ergonomics programs can be mapped and optimized as a value stream.
An effective way to anticipate the problem is to provide young students with adequate knowledge of ergonomics and computer use and environmental design, and now there is an urgent need for specific guidelines to protect school students.
To begin a program, CPA firms can create an internal ergonomics committee to gather information and seek training or hire a consultant.
Many of us will be familiar with non-application of ergonomics through ailments such as backache or repetitive strain injury.
In addition to working with the coalition, the institute has partnered with other organizations to design office ergonomic interventions, Robertson said.
Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently released a set of recommendations entitled Ergonomics for the Prevention of Musculoskeletal Disorders--Guidelines for Retail Stores.
That helps us in our consultation with our customers in dealing with space design and ergonomics.
After the council's decision was released, NAM issued a press release saying its members had scored another "major victory on ergonomics.
The Ergonomics in Education Study Commission will include teachers, school administrators, medical professionals and ergonomics researchers.
The two organizations will provide NADONA/LTC members with information to help promote employee health and safety, reaching out to those who may benefit from guidance in the development, implementation, or improvement of facility ergonomics programs.