ergonomics

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er·go·nom·ics

(er'gō-nom'iks),
A branch of ecology concerned with human factors in the design and operation of machines and the physical environment.
[ergo- + G. nomos, law]

ergonomics

/er·go·nom·ics/ (er″go-nom´iks) the science relating to humans and their work, including the factors affecting the efficient use of human energy.

ergonomics

[ur′gōnom′iks]
Etymology: Gk, ergon, work, nomos, law
a scientific discipline devoted to the study and analysis of human work, especially as it is affected by individual anatomical, psychological, and other human characteristics. ergonomic, adj.

ergonomics

The formal study of the work environment, which evaluates and, if necessary, reconfigures a workplace by taking into account the anatomic, physiological and psychological variables of those working in the environment.

ergonomics

Occupation medicine The formal study of work situations, which attempts to evaluate, and if necessary, reconfigure a workplace by taking into account the anatomic and psychological variables of those working in the environment. See Ergogenic engineering, Human factor.

er·go·nom·ics

(ĕr'gŏ-nom'iks)
The science of workplace, tools, and equipment designed to reduce worker discomfort, strain, and fatigue and to prevent work-related injuries.
The science of workplace, tools, and equipment designed to reduce worker discomfort, strain, and fatigue and to prevent work-related injuries.
[ergo- + G. nomos, law]

ergonomics

The scientific study of humans in relation to their working environment and the application of science to improve working conditions. The increasing application of complex technology has resulted in increasing human discomfort, difficulties and dangers. Ergonomics seeks to solve such problems.

ergonomics (er·g·nˑ·miks),

n applied study of psychology, anatomy, and physiology relating to people and work environments; includes introduction of biomechanically suppor-tive equipment.

er·go·nom·ics

(ĕr'gŏ-nom'iks)
The science of workplace, tools, and equipment designed to reduce worker discomfort, strain, and fatigue and to prevent work-related injuries.
[ergo- + G. nomos, law]

ergonomics

the science of relating the physiological and anatomical characteristics of the working or racing animal to the physical aspects of its working environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
All these approaches with their specifics can be used in the ergonomic design of the workplace.
From adjustable desks--both hand-crank and electric--to specialty chairs like the popular Swopper ergonomic chair, Jones says buyers are interested in workday comfort.
Whether you're selecting office seating, worksurfaces, or computer equipment and accessories, the human factor is the key element of ergonomic intuition.
The Aeron is highly adjustable and highly ergonomic, which means that you have less days off with back pain, according to the manufacturer, which notes that the Aeron is one of only eight chairs in the world that were presented an Ergonomics Excellence Award in 2004 by the Furniture Industry Research Association, which tests furniture and acts as consultant to the industry and its users.
Wynit offers us the opportunity to sell our Ergonomic Keyboards to companies such as Gateway, Dell, EDS and many others -- all of whom currently purchase computer peripherals from Wynit.
The Department of Labor realizes that the furniture industry has been involved in developing and implementing ergonomic interventions in furniture companies.
UConn's ErgoCenter, which has been appointed to the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health's expert panel on ergonomics, has developed a series of tests that study the ergonomic benefits of certain tool designs.
After the tooth-and-nail battles with the Clinton Administration over an ergonomic standard, the Bush Administration's approach comes as welcome relief to food industry companies, though perhaps not to those representing workers.
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has named a coordinator for each of its 10 regional offices to assist OSHA staff, employers, employees and others with ergonomic issues.
In an effort to dramatically reduce and prevent ergonomic injuries in the workplace, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) last week released a comprehensive plan that includes industry-targeted guidelines, tough enforcement measures, workplace outreach, advanced research and a plan to protect immigrant workers.
Chief among these issues are ergonomic injuries in the workplace, and the role, if any, that the federal government will play in preventing these injuries.