ergonomics

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er·go·nom·ics

(er'gō-nom'iks),
A branch of ecology concerned with human factors in the design and operation of machines and the physical environment.
[ergo- + G. nomos, law]

ergonomics

/er·go·nom·ics/ (er″go-nom´iks) the science relating to humans and their work, including the factors affecting the efficient use of human energy.

ergonomics

[ur′gōnom′iks]
Etymology: Gk, ergon, work, nomos, law
a scientific discipline devoted to the study and analysis of human work, especially as it is affected by individual anatomical, psychological, and other human characteristics. ergonomic, adj.

ergonomics

The formal study of the work environment, which evaluates and, if necessary, reconfigures a workplace by taking into account the anatomic, physiological and psychological variables of those working in the environment.

ergonomics

Occupation medicine The formal study of work situations, which attempts to evaluate, and if necessary, reconfigure a workplace by taking into account the anatomic and psychological variables of those working in the environment. See Ergogenic engineering, Human factor.

er·go·nom·ics

(ĕr'gŏ-nom'iks)
The science of workplace, tools, and equipment designed to reduce worker discomfort, strain, and fatigue and to prevent work-related injuries.
The science of workplace, tools, and equipment designed to reduce worker discomfort, strain, and fatigue and to prevent work-related injuries.
[ergo- + G. nomos, law]

ergonomics

The scientific study of humans in relation to their working environment and the application of science to improve working conditions. The increasing application of complex technology has resulted in increasing human discomfort, difficulties and dangers. Ergonomics seeks to solve such problems.

ergonomics (er·g·nˑ·miks),

n applied study of psychology, anatomy, and physiology relating to people and work environments; includes introduction of biomechanically suppor-tive equipment.

er·go·nom·ics

(ĕr'gŏ-nom'iks)
The science of workplace, tools, and equipment designed to reduce worker discomfort, strain, and fatigue and to prevent work-related injuries.
[ergo- + G. nomos, law]

ergonomics

the science of relating the physiological and anatomical characteristics of the working or racing animal to the physical aspects of its working environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based upon a range of department requirements and goals RedRick will recommend the optimal ergonomic configuration.
Our partnership is a natural fit allowing ETC to expand its ergonomic services to their existing client base and prospective clients.
Employers are encouraged to apply these guidelines in their workplaces and to consult with OSHA's compliance assistance staff when implementing an industry specific ergonomic plan.
For each ergonomic evaluation, students became familiar with industry requirements for personnel production and identified methods for adapting the workplace to the capabilities of individuals with specific disabilities.
To reduce strain and fatigue from the most tiring household tasks, Marut and Hedge say, new ergonomic products are needed to decrease the effort, such as bending and stretching, involved in scrubbing and mopping.
Originally viewed as products designed to help arthritic consumers cope in the kitchen, ergonomic items have been accepted by the masses.
It would require all American businesses to become full-time experts in ergonomics, a field for which there is little if any credible evidence.
An added incentive to purchase or design equipment that provides an ergonomic solution is the likelihood of increased productivity from your workers.
The Kinesis Ergonomic Keyboard ($275; 800-4-KINESIS) is innovative in its design.
To be effective, ergonomic research, and the solutions (or "interventions") that arise from it, must be based on sound science.
They gave me lots of advice and even follow-up calls from the "RSI police" to make sure I was dealing with my lousy ergonomic setup.
Historically, ergonomic principles were based on data developed through military research for the purpose of producing more effective weapons.