ergogenic aid


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Related to ergogenic aid: ergolytic

ergogenic aid

a substance, such as a steroid, used by athletes with the expectation that it will provide a competitive edge.

ergogenic aid

A popular term for any device intended to enhance athletic performance, which can be conceptually divided into mechanical, physiological and mental factors.

Ergogenic aids
• Mechanical—Reduced friction, improved aerodynamics, lighter weight, better wicking of perspiration, composite materials that provide better resiliency, etc.
  — Fabrics
  — Equipment
• Physiology
  — Bicarbonates
  — Carbohydrates
  — Phosphates
  — Nutritional supplements
  — Pharmacologic aids
• Mental
  — Counselling
  — Psychological support
  — Personal support (family and friends)

er·go·gen·ic aid

(ĕr'gō-jen'ik ād)
Ergogenic aids have been classified as nutritional, pharmacologic, physiologic, or psychological; methods to enhance athletic performance range from use of accepted techniques such as carbohydrate loading to illegal and unsafe approaches such as use of anabolic-androgenic steroids.

ergogenic aid

In sports medicine, the questionable and often harmful use of various substances to try to enhance performance. Some of these materials, e.g., blood transfusions, anabolic steroids, amphetamines, amino acids, and human growth hormone, are standard medicines approved for uses other than those intended by the athlete. Others are not only not indicated for any illness but may be harmful, esp. when the amount of the active ingredient in the product is unknown. Included in this latter group are cyproheptadine, taken to increase appetite, strength, and, allegedly, testosterone production; ginseng; pangamic acid; octacosanol, a 28-carbon straight-chain alcohol obtained from wheat germ oil, the biological effects of which are unknown; guarana, prepared from the seeds of the Paulliania cupana tree, used for its alleged ability to increase energy; gamma-oryzanol, an isomer of oryzanol extracted from rice bran oil, allegedly useful in decreasing recovery time after exercise; proteolytic enzymes, e.g., chymotrypsin, trypsin-chymotrypsin, and papain, the safety and efficacy of which have not been established, esp. when used with oral anticoagulants or by pregnant or lactating women; and bee pollen, which has shown no evidence of improving athletic performance.
See: anabolic agent; blood doping
See also: aid
References in periodicals archive ?
HMB is a relatively new ergogenic aid and published results are considered preliminary.
The purpose of this study was to examine the incidence of drug use by interscholastic high school athletes, and to see if participation in interscholastic athletics is related to a healthier lifestyle, specifically decreased use of recreational drugs and ergogenic aids year-round.
None of the vitamins and minerals in a typical multivitamin have enough evidence to be considered ergogenic aids.
A critical literature review of trials of the effect of these ergogenic aids on exercise performance trials was conducted.
2008) The effect of caffeine as an ergogenic aid in anaerobic exercise.
1999) Sodium bicarbonate can be used as an ergogenic aid in high intensity, competitive cycle ergometry of 1h duration.
placebo effects of an ergogenic aid on athletic performance.
Sport supplements and ergogenic aids are products used to enhance athletic performance.
This trend indicates that there is a behavioral link between users of ergogenic aids and nonmedical steroids.
The authors discuss the demographics of these athletes, systemic changes that occur with aging, the basic science of aging musculoskeletal tissues, and osteoporosis and osteomalacia, as well as general health, nutrition, and exercise considerations, including anti-aging and ergogenic aids, cardiovascular concerns, age and sex-related performance decline in elite senior athletes, and the psychology of the aging athlete.