ergogenic aid


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Related to ergogenic aid: ergolytic

ergogenic aid

a substance, such as a steroid, used by athletes with the expectation that it will provide a competitive edge.

ergogenic aid

A popular term for any device intended to enhance athletic performance, which can be conceptually divided into mechanical, physiological and mental factors.

Ergogenic aids
• Mechanical—Reduced friction, improved aerodynamics, lighter weight, better wicking of perspiration, composite materials that provide better resiliency, etc.
  — Fabrics
  — Equipment
• Physiology
  — Bicarbonates
  — Carbohydrates
  — Phosphates
  — Nutritional supplements
  — Pharmacologic aids
• Mental
  — Counselling
  — Psychological support
  — Personal support (family and friends)

er·go·gen·ic aid

(ĕr'gō-jen'ik ād)
Ergogenic aids have been classified as nutritional, pharmacologic, physiologic, or psychological; methods to enhance athletic performance range from use of accepted techniques such as carbohydrate loading to illegal and unsafe approaches such as use of anabolic-androgenic steroids.

ergogenic aid

In sports medicine, the questionable and often harmful use of various substances to try to enhance performance. Some of these materials, e.g., blood transfusions, anabolic steroids, amphetamines, amino acids, and human growth hormone, are standard medicines approved for uses other than those intended by the athlete. Others are not only not indicated for any illness but may be harmful, esp. when the amount of the active ingredient in the product is unknown. Included in this latter group are cyproheptadine, taken to increase appetite, strength, and, allegedly, testosterone production; ginseng; pangamic acid; octacosanol, a 28-carbon straight-chain alcohol obtained from wheat germ oil, the biological effects of which are unknown; guarana, prepared from the seeds of the Paulliania cupana tree, used for its alleged ability to increase energy; gamma-oryzanol, an isomer of oryzanol extracted from rice bran oil, allegedly useful in decreasing recovery time after exercise; proteolytic enzymes, e.g., chymotrypsin, trypsin-chymotrypsin, and papain, the safety and efficacy of which have not been established, esp. when used with oral anticoagulants or by pregnant or lactating women; and bee pollen, which has shown no evidence of improving athletic performance.
See: anabolic agent; blood doping
See also: aid
References in periodicals archive ?
2,37) The interest in creatine as an ergogenic aid revolves around its ability to participate as an energy substrate for muscle contraction.
Conversely, Wadler and Hainline (1989) have suggested that athletes maybe more likely to experiment with recreational and ergogenic aids than individuals not participating in athletics.
Overall, these findings provide evidence for the efficacy of LactiGo[TM] topical gel as an ergogenic aid.
This does not necessary mean ergogenic aids as defined by the International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) below (Table 2, p.
Many athletes make extensive use of ergogenic aids in the hope that they can favourably affect athletic performance and increase lean body mass.
Use of oral creatine as an ergogenic aid for increase sports performance: perceptions of adolescent athletes South Med J 2001; 94(6):608-12
The purpose of our survey was to determine the use of oral creatine as an ergogenic aid among the adolescent athlete population.
According to the International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN), the definition of an ergogenic aid "Is any training technique, mechanical device, nutritional practice, pharmacological method, or psychological technique that can improve exercise performance capacity and/or enhance training adaptations.
Only a few studies have used peptide glutamine as an ergogenic aid for improving athletic performance.
Although it is clear that supplementation raises intramuscular creatine stores,[5] it remains unclear how effective creatine is as an ergogenic aid.
As an ergogenic aid, it is believed that the benefit of wearing a lower-body compression garment is related to the improved venous hemodynamics (11,22) that increases enddiastolic volume and cardiac output (14,25), although such changes are not always observed when the subject is not lying down (15,18).