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equivalent

 [e-kwiv´ah-lent]
1. of equal value or force.
2. in chemistry, having the same valence.
anxiety-equivalent translation of anxiety into a kind of emotional activity, e.g., the experiencing or expression of angry feelings.
full time equivalent (FTE) the equivalent of one full time staff member; a total number of full time equivalents is planned for in making budget allocations. A combination of part time staff members can be used to equal one full time equivalent.

e·quiv·a·lent (Eq, eq),

(ē-kwiv'ă-lent),
1. Equal in any respect.
2. That which is equal in size, weight, force, or any other quality to something else.
3. Having the capability to counterbalance or neutralize each other.
4. Having equal valencies.
5. Synonym(s): gram equivalent
6. Used to describe a symptom complex that is less commonly associated with a syndrome than the usual classic symptoms or chief complaint.
[see equivalence]

equivalent

/equiv·a·lent/ (e-kwiv´ah-lent)
1. having the same value; neutralizing or counterbalancing each other.
2. see under weight .

migraine equivalent  the presence of the aura associated with a migraine but in the absence of a headache.

e·quiv·a·lent

(ē-kwiv'ă-lĕnt)
1. Equal in any respect.
2. That which is equal in size, weight, force, or any other quality to something else.
3. Having the capability to counterbalance or neutralize each other.
4. Having equal valences.
5. Synonym(s): gram equivalent.

e·quiv·a·lent

(ē-kwiv'ă-lĕnt)
1. Equal in any respect.
2. That which is equal in size, weight, force, or any other quality to something else.
3. Having the capability to counterbalance or neutralize each other.
4. Used to describe a symptom complex less commonly associated with a syndrome than the usual classic symptoms.

equivalent,

n a state where there is an equal in force, value, measure, or effect; corresponding in function.
equivalent, aluminum,
n the thickness of pure aluminum affording the same radiation attenuation, under specified conditions, as the material or materials being considered.
equivalent, concrete,
n the thickness of concrete having a density of 2.35 g/cm3 that would afford the same radiation attenuation, under specified conditions, as the material or materials being considered.
equivalent, lead,
n the thickness of pure lead that would afford the same radiation attenuation, under specified conditions, as the material or materials being considered.

equivalent

1. of equal force, power, value, etc.
2. something that has equivalent properties.
3. chemical equivalent.

chemical equivalent
that weight in grams of a substance that will produce or react with 1 mole of hydrogen ion or 1 mole of electrons. Symbol Eq. The concentrations of electrolytes are often specified in milliequivalents per liter (mEq/l).
epilepsy equivalent
any disturbance, mental or physical, that may take the place of an epileptic seizure.
temperature equivalent
see Table 5.
References in classic literature ?
Thus, by the substitu- tion of nickels for gold on a king's-evil day, I not only injured no one, dissatisfied no one, but pleased all concerned and saved four-fifths of that day's national expense into the bargain -- a saving which would have been the equivalent of $800,000 in my day in America.
Mr Burd suggests that this word probably comes near the modern equivalent of Machiavelli's thought when he speaks of "crudelta" than the more obvious "cruelties.
One cartload of the enemy's provisions is equivalent to twenty of one's own, and likewise a single picul of his provender is equivalent to twenty from one's own store.
Sight' is a 'positive', 'blindness' a 'privative', but 'to possess sight' is not equivalent to 'sight', 'to be blind' is not equivalent to 'blindness'.
You must decide for yourself," said Elizabeth; "and if, upon mature deliberation, you find that the misery of disobliging his two sisters is more than equivalent to the happiness of being his wife, I advise you by all means to refuse him.
As to King Charles, the question must be viewed differently; in receiving and aiding him, France will censure the acts of the English nation, and thus so essentially harm England, and especially the well-being of the government, that such a proceeding will be equivalent to pronounced hostilities.
Captain Bonneville immediately dispatched two spies to over-take the rival party, and endeavor to learn their plans; in the meantime, he turned his back upon the swamp and its musk-rat houses and followed on at "long camps, which in trapper's language is equivalent to long stages.
More and more curious to ascertain our fate, I now threw together in the form of a question the words 'Happar' and 'Motarkee', the latter being equivalent to the word 'good'.
The thing was equivalent to saying, "My sword, my body, my life, my soul are yours to do with as you wish.
This is equivalent to throwing out that weight of ballast.
I do not consider that the cigars and whisky he consumed at my expense (he always refused cocktails, since he was practically a teetotaller), and the few dollars, borrowed with a civil air of conferring a favour upon me, that passed from my pocket to his, were in any way equivalent to the entertainment he afforded me.
The second method is to consider the actions of some one man- a king or a commander- as equivalent to the sum of many individual wills; whereas the sum of individual wills is never expressed by the activity of a single historic personage.