equivalency

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Related to equivalence relation: Equivalence class

e·quiv·a·lence

, equivalency (ē-kwiv'ă-lens, -len-sē),
1. The property of an element or radical of combining with or displacing, in definite and fixed proportion, another element or radical in a compound.
2. The point in a precipitin test at which antibody and antigen are present in optimal proportions.
[L. aequus, equal, + valentia, strength (valence)]

e·quiv·a·lence

, equivalency (ē-kwiv'ă-lĕns, -lĕn-sē)
The property of an element or radical of combining with or displacing, in definite and fixed proportion, another element or radical in a compound.
[L. aequus, equal, + valentia, strength (valence)]

equivalency

the combining power of an electrolyte. See also equivalent.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since we want a poset, it is necessary to require two more properties of our equivalence relation.
A triple (t, E, [alpha]) is called a time scale if t is a nonempty closed subset of r and E is an arranged equivalence relation on t.
This can be seen as further support for the RFT approach as Barnes et al suggested that symbol-referent relations (in natural language) are functionally similar to equivalence relations in a matching-to-sample context.
1 Let [equivalent to] be an equivalence relation defined on [A.
By contrast, the formation of equivalence relations among formally dissimilar stimuli, whether acquired through respondent (e.
By learning how to predict the effects of equivalence classes on the development of new behavioral relations, we may further our understanding of the nature of the equivalence relation, extend its generality, and enhance our ability to control behavior.
The directly trained trials were intact during the test, and she passed the symmetry test but had too many incorrect responses on the equivalence relations.
Specifically, during equivalence testing, the predicted equivalence relations involved stimuli that differed in colour, whereas the non-equivalent sample-comparison relations involved stimuli that matched in terms of colour.
In contrast, a typical derived relations test assesses the emergence of all symmetry relations, transitive relations, and equivalence relations.
If M1 = M2 = M, then both equivalence [equivalent to] and k-equivalence [equivalent to]k are equivalence relations that they obey the reflexive, symmetric and transitive laws.
The authors attributed this difference to previously established behavioral relations interfering with the emergence of equivalence relations in the laboratory.