equinus

equinus

[ēkwī′nəs]
Etymology: L, horse
a condition characterized by tiptoe walking on one or both feet. It is usually associated with clubfoot.

equinus

Orthopedics Fixation of the foot, or part of a foot, in a plantarflexed position it would assume if the distal end of the part is farther away from the tibia Types Talipes equinus–fixed position of plantarflexion of the ankle joint; forefoot equinus—the fixed position of plantar flexed attitude of the forefoot in relation to the rearfoot. See Clubfoot.
References in periodicals archive ?
Differential diagnosis and treatment of posterior ankle pain in dancers and equinus athletes.
Spastic equinus foot: multicenter study of the long-term results of tibial neurotomy.
In the system of Catterall/Pirani, (22,23) the components of posterior crease, empty heel, rigid equinus, curvature of the lateral border, medial crease, and reducibility of the lateral head of the talus are each scored 0, 0.
Calf muscle-tendon lengths before and after Tendo-Achilles lengthenings and gastrocnemius lengthenings for equinus in cerebral palsy and idiopathic toe walking.
COMPLICATIONS DISTAL TIBIA PROXIMAL TIBIA DEEP INFECTION 3 DELAYED UNION 2 EQUINUS 1 ANKLE AND KNEE STIFFNESS 2 1 SUPERFICIAL INFECTION 2 1 Note: Table made from bar graph.
Epidemiology of pes varus and/or equinus one year after a first cerebral hemisphere stroke: Apropos of a cohort of 86 patients].
In treatment phase serial manipulations and casting are done to gradually correct the deformity and a percutaneous tenotomy of the Achilles tendon to correct the residual ankle equinus.
Repetitive high-impact activity loading on the forefoot can cause trauma to the periosteum and adjacent soft tissue resulting in ongoing inflammation, other factors can include prominent metatarsal heads, tight toe extensors, weak toe flexors, hypermobile first ray, excessive pronation or an equinus deformity causing restricted dorsiflexion during ambulation and consequent forefoot overloading.
Valgus and equinus were observed in some students, and some students had varus deformity.
The shorter side could have foot equinus, hip joint drop, over-extension of knee joint, while the longer side might have over-flexion of hip and knee joint, and over-pronation at subtalar joint (22).
This taxon is now recognized as a complex of at least 5 distinct species that encompass 10 genotypes with different host specificities: E granulosus sensu stricto (genotypes G1G3), E equinus (G4), E ortleppi (G5), and E canadensis (G6-G10) (3).
Managing equinus in children with cerebral palsy: electrical stimulation to strengthen the triceps surae muscle.