equilibrium


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Related to equilibrium: Equilibrium of forces

equilibrium

 [e″kwĭ-lib´re-um]
1. harmonious adjustment of different elements or parts; called also balance.
2. a state of chemical balance in the body, reached when the tissues contain the proper proportions of various salts and water. See also acid-base balance and fluid balance.
dynamic equilibrium the condition of balance between varying, shifting, and opposing forces that is characteristic of living processes.

e·qui·lib·ri·um

(ē'kwi-lib'rē-ŭm),
1. The condition of being evenly balanced; a state of repose between two or more antagonistic forces that exactly counteract each other.
See also: equilibrium constant.
2. In chemistry, a state of apparent repose created by two reactions proceeding in opposite directions at equal speed; in chemical equations, sometimes indicated by two opposing arrows (⇄) instead of the equal sign.
See also: equilibrium constant. Synonym(s): dynamic equilibrium
[L. aequilibrium, a horizontal position, fr. aequus, equal, + libra, a balance]

equilibrium

/equi·li·bri·um/ (e″kwĭ-lib´re-um)
1. balance; harmonious adjustment of parts.

dynamic equilibrium  the condition of balance between varying, shifting, and opposing forces that is characteristic of living processes.

equilibrium

[ē′kwilib′rē·əm]
Etymology: L, aequilibrium
1 a state of balance or rest resulting from the equal action of opposing forces such as calcium and phosphorus in the body.
2 (in psychiatry) a state of mental or emotional balance.
3 (in radiotherapy) a point at which the rate of production of a daughter element is equal to the rate of decay of the parent element and the activities of parent and daughter are identical.

equilibrium

Imaging
An MRI term for a state of balance between two opposing forces or divergent spheres of influence.

equilibrium

A state of constancy in a system; a population might be in static equilibrium–no pasa nada–ie, no births or deaths, or in dynamic equilibrium–ie, same numbers of births and deaths; the state to which a system evolves–eg, sustained periodic oscillations. See Chemical equilibrium, Linkage equilibrium, Sedimentation equilibrium Neurology A state of balance in the body, where forces are appropriately offset by counterforces. Cf Dizziness, Equilibrium, Vertigo Orthopedics A state of biomechanical homeostasis that enables persons to know where their bodies are in the environment and to maintain a desired position. See Fixed point equilibrium.

e·qui·lib·ri·um

(ē'kwi-lib'rē-ŭm)
1. The condition of being evenly balanced; a state of repose between two or more antagonistic forces that exactly counteract each other.
2. chemistry A state of apparent repose created by two reactions proceeding in opposite directions at equal speed; in chemical equations, sometimes indicated by two opposing arrows (↔) or (⇌).
Synonym(s): dynamic equilibrium.
[L. aequilibrium, a horizontal position, fr. aequus, equal, + libra, a balance]

equilibrium

(1) in mechanics, a state when the force and moments on a body or object at rest or moving with constant velocity are balanced (i.e. the net force and net moment are zero); (2) in chemistry, the condition when there are no net changes in the concentrations of reacting substances and their products.

e·qui·lib·ri·um

(ē'kwi-lib'rē-ŭm)
Condition of being evenly balanced; a state of repose between two or more antagonistic forces that exactly counteract each other.
[L. aequilibrium, a horizontal position, fr. aequus, equal, + libra, a balance]

equilibrium (ē´kwilib´rēəm),

n a state of balance between two opposing forces or processes.
equilibrium, functional,
n the state of homeostasis within the oral cavity existing when biologic processes and local environmental factors, including the forces of mastication, are in a state of balance.
equilibrium, juvenile occlusal
(joo´vənīl əkloo´səl),
n one of the six eruptive phases of dentition, and the first of three postfunctional stages of eruption of the entire dentition. It occurs at or near adolescence when permanent teeth continue to erupt into the oral cavity in response to the vertical growth of the ramus.

equilibrium

a state of balance between opposing forces or influences. In the body, equilibrium may be chemical or physical. A state of chemical equilibrium is reached when the body tissues contain the proper proportions of various salts and water. See also acid-base balance and fluid balance. Physical equilibrium, such as the state of balance required for walking or standing, is achieved by a very complex interplay of opposing sets of muscles. The labyrinth of the inner ear contains the semicircular canals, or organs of balance, and relays to the brain information about the body's position and also the direction of body motions. Genetic equilibrium is achieved when the allelic frequencies do not change from generation to generation.

equilibrium dialysis
a technique for determining the affinity of an antibody for an antigen.
equilibrium disturbances
see posture, posture balance.
dynamic equilibrium
the condition of balance between varying, shifting and opposing forces that is characteristic of living processes.
References in classic literature ?
Change of scene, and absence of the necessity for thought, will restore the mental equilibrium.
Then he was upon one of his assailants and before the fellow could regain his equilibrium and leap back after delivering his cut, the ape-man had seized him by the neck and crotch.
For an instant she ran on, stumbling, in a mad effort to regain her equilibrium, but the upturned furrows caught her feet--again she stumbled and this time went down, and as she scrambled to rise again a heavy body fell upon her and seized her arms.
As the man stepped backward to recover his equilibrium both feet struck the obstacle.
In her mind's eye she could see the straining naked forms of black men bending rhythmically to the work, and somewhere on that strange deck she knew was the inevitable master-man, conning the vessel in to its anchorage, peering at the dim tree-line of the shore, judging the deceitful night-distances, feeling on his cheek the first fans of the land breeze that was even then beginning to blow, weighing, thinking, measuring, gauging the score or more of ever- shifting forces, through which, by which, and in spite of which he directed the steady equilibrium of his course.
Any indignity that Villa Kennan chose to inflict upon him he was throbbingly glad to receive, such as doubling his ears inside out till they stuck, at the same time making him sit upright, with helpless forefeet paddling the air for equilibrium, while she blew roguishly in his face and nostrils.
The old man contorted himself aboard, rolling his body across the gunwale so quickly, that, even while it started to capsize, his weight was across the danger-point and counterbalancing the canoe to its proper equilibrium.
He saw no necessity for anyone's losing their equilibrium merely because their sister or their daughter had stayed away from home.
In the involuntary effort to maintain equilibrium, Joe had uncovered himself, flinging one arm out and lifting his head from beneath the sheltering shoulders.
All must hope that some day America would penetrate the deepest secrets of that mysterious orb; and some even seemed to fear lest its conquest should not sensibly derange the equilibrium of Europe.
Stability, equilibrium," he said, relaxing on the instant and sinking his body back into repose.
Similarly, you may sometimes find on a mountain-side a large rock poised so delicately that a touch will set it crashing down into the valley, while the rocks all round are so firm that only a considerable force can dislodge them What is analogous in these two cases is the existence of a great store of energy in unstable equilibrium ready to burst into violent motion by the addition of a very slight disturbance.