equilibrium

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Related to equilibria: Punctuated equilibria

equilibrium

 [e″kwĭ-lib´re-um]
1. harmonious adjustment of different elements or parts; called also balance.
2. a state of chemical balance in the body, reached when the tissues contain the proper proportions of various salts and water. See also acid-base balance and fluid balance.
dynamic equilibrium the condition of balance between varying, shifting, and opposing forces that is characteristic of living processes.

e·qui·lib·ri·um

(ē'kwi-lib'rē-ŭm),
1. The condition of being evenly balanced; a state of repose between two or more antagonistic forces that exactly counteract each other.
See also: equilibrium constant.
2. In chemistry, a state of apparent repose created by two reactions proceeding in opposite directions at equal speed; in chemical equations, sometimes indicated by two opposing arrows (⇄) instead of the equal sign.
See also: equilibrium constant. Synonym(s): dynamic equilibrium
[L. aequilibrium, a horizontal position, fr. aequus, equal, + libra, a balance]

equilibrium

/equi·li·bri·um/ (e″kwĭ-lib´re-um)
1. balance; harmonious adjustment of parts.

dynamic equilibrium  the condition of balance between varying, shifting, and opposing forces that is characteristic of living processes.

equilibrium

[ē′kwilib′rē·əm]
Etymology: L, aequilibrium
1 a state of balance or rest resulting from the equal action of opposing forces such as calcium and phosphorus in the body.
2 (in psychiatry) a state of mental or emotional balance.
3 (in radiotherapy) a point at which the rate of production of a daughter element is equal to the rate of decay of the parent element and the activities of parent and daughter are identical.

equilibrium

Imaging
An MRI term for a state of balance between two opposing forces or divergent spheres of influence.

equilibrium

A state of constancy in a system; a population might be in static equilibrium–no pasa nada–ie, no births or deaths, or in dynamic equilibrium–ie, same numbers of births and deaths; the state to which a system evolves–eg, sustained periodic oscillations. See Chemical equilibrium, Linkage equilibrium, Sedimentation equilibrium Neurology A state of balance in the body, where forces are appropriately offset by counterforces. Cf Dizziness, Equilibrium, Vertigo Orthopedics A state of biomechanical homeostasis that enables persons to know where their bodies are in the environment and to maintain a desired position. See Fixed point equilibrium.

e·qui·lib·ri·um

(ē'kwi-lib'rē-ŭm)
1. The condition of being evenly balanced; a state of repose between two or more antagonistic forces that exactly counteract each other.
2. chemistry A state of apparent repose created by two reactions proceeding in opposite directions at equal speed; in chemical equations, sometimes indicated by two opposing arrows (↔) or (⇌).
Synonym(s): dynamic equilibrium.
[L. aequilibrium, a horizontal position, fr. aequus, equal, + libra, a balance]

equilibrium

(1) in mechanics, a state when the force and moments on a body or object at rest or moving with constant velocity are balanced (i.e. the net force and net moment are zero); (2) in chemistry, the condition when there are no net changes in the concentrations of reacting substances and their products.

e·qui·lib·ri·um

(ē'kwi-lib'rē-ŭm)
Condition of being evenly balanced; a state of repose between two or more antagonistic forces that exactly counteract each other.
[L. aequilibrium, a horizontal position, fr. aequus, equal, + libra, a balance]

equilibrium (ē´kwilib´rēəm),

n a state of balance between two opposing forces or processes.
equilibrium, functional,
n the state of homeostasis within the oral cavity existing when biologic processes and local environmental factors, including the forces of mastication, are in a state of balance.
equilibrium, juvenile occlusal
(joo´vənīl əkloo´səl),
n one of the six eruptive phases of dentition, and the first of three postfunctional stages of eruption of the entire dentition. It occurs at or near adolescence when permanent teeth continue to erupt into the oral cavity in response to the vertical growth of the ramus.

equilibrium

a state of balance between opposing forces or influences. In the body, equilibrium may be chemical or physical. A state of chemical equilibrium is reached when the body tissues contain the proper proportions of various salts and water. See also acid-base balance and fluid balance. Physical equilibrium, such as the state of balance required for walking or standing, is achieved by a very complex interplay of opposing sets of muscles. The labyrinth of the inner ear contains the semicircular canals, or organs of balance, and relays to the brain information about the body's position and also the direction of body motions. Genetic equilibrium is achieved when the allelic frequencies do not change from generation to generation.

equilibrium dialysis
a technique for determining the affinity of an antibody for an antigen.
equilibrium disturbances
see posture, posture balance.
dynamic equilibrium
the condition of balance between varying, shifting and opposing forces that is characteristic of living processes.
References in periodicals archive ?
The next result simply records the fact that the phenomenon of convergence to a zero price was observed even though other equilibria exist.
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3) can have more than one equilibrium point in the interior of the first quadrant and we studied the stability of the equilibria.
Note that other equilibria exist in which the rejection rate is 100%.