equifinality

(redirected from equifinal)
Also found in: Dictionary.

equifinality

 [e″kwĭ-fi-nal´ĭ-te]
a principle of general systems theory stating that an open system can attain a time-independent state not dependent on initial conditions and determined only by the system parameters.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a fundamental sense, Spivak misreads Bhunaveswari's action, blinding in its symbolic fury, and in its forceful and equifinal choice unveiled in her letter or suicide note, as both an act of resistance and autonomy; a willingness to speak by signifying, as does Phephelaphi, through recourse to ritual suicide.
The analyses indicate that two equifinal paths lead to positive change: a domestic one and one including external incentives as a necessary component.
Thus, consistent with Gresov and Drazin (1997), we posit that when considered in tandem, functional demands and strategic latitude result in four different equifinal situations, each associated with a different form of equifinality (see Figure 1).
This is the simplest equifinal situation where performance depends on the organization's ability to identify and adopt the ideal strategy to meet a single, dominant functional demand.
hospital industry between different equifinal states, the industry offers a natural experimental setting in which to examine and test important elements of Gresov and Drazin's model of equifinality.
Hypothesis 1: Organizational performance will be higher in trade-off equifinal situations than in suboptimal equifinal situations.
It is equally consistent within Gresov and Drazin's framework to expect different strategies to be more prevalent and viable within different equifinal situations.
Hypothesis 2: In trade-off equifinal situations, organizations whose strategy satisfies the dominant functional demand will outperform organizations whose strategy does not.
Hypothesis 3: In trade-off equifinal situations, most firms pursue strategies consistent with the dominant functional demand.
For Eisenhardt and Martin, dynamic capabilities are equifinal, and firms can therefore develop them from many starting points and along different paths.
A second, related assumption is that organizational actions are mediated by equifinal processes.
Aubrey Burl tries valiantly to reduce their variety to comprehensible order, using principles like 'long to short, 1800 to 1000 BC', and grouping them by 'long single rows', 'multiple rows', 'four- to six-stone rows and three-stone rows' and 'pairs of standing stones'; but this is to reify equifinal states which may result not only from the similar outcomes of prehistoric processes bat from more recent attrition -- which can convert monuments from one classification to another by the vagaries of a farmer's wall-mending needs or the more systematically destructive effects of road-building.