eponym

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eponym

 [ep´o-nim]
a name or phrase formed from or including a person's name, such as Hodgkin's disease, Cowper's glands, or Schick test. adj., adj eponym´ic, epon´ymous.

ep·o·nym

(ep'ō-nim),
The name of a disease, structure, operation, or procedure, usually derived from the name of the person who discovered or described it first.
[G. epōnymos, named after]

eponym

[ep′ənim]
Etymology: Gk, epi, above, onyma, name
a name for a disease, organ, procedure, or body function that is derived from the name of a person, usually a physician or scientist who first identified the condition or devised the object bearing the name. Examples include fallopian tube, Parkinson's disease, and Billing's method.

eponym

Medtalk A syndrome, lesion, surgical procedure or clinical sign that bears the name of the author who first described the entity, or less commonly, the name of the index Pt(s) in whom the lesion was first described

ep·o·nym

(ep'ŏ-nim)
The name of a disease, structure, operation, or procedure, usually derived from the name of the person who first discovered or described it.
Synonym(s): eponymic (2) .
[G. epōnymos, named after]

eponym

A name of a disease, syndrome, anatomical part, surgical instrument, etc derived from the name of the person who discovered, invented or first successfully promulgated it.

eponym

a name or phrase formed from or including a person's name, e.g. Theiler's disease, Cowper's gland, Aschheim-Zondek test.
References in periodicals archive ?
Though the wounded pride of frustrated potential eponyms is not to be taken lightly, in the grand scheme of things not much damage is done by eponymic inaccuracy, as long as the practical function of eponymy is not impaired.
What can impair the practical usefulness of eponymy in science is the sheer proliferation of eponymic expressions.
One benefit of having all these expressions collected in one place is the opportunity it provides for investigating certain general questions related to economic eponymy.
6) Two other items that might have been included under this broader interpretation of economic eponymy are "Bonar's catalog" (Bonar 1932), which would have been welcomed by Smithian scholars with an antiquarian bent (though it might have mystified some of our econometric brethren), and the "Summers-Heston database" (Summers and Heston 1991), which had a tremendous impact on applied work and transformed the study of economic growth in recent decades.
The "F" of course is for "Friedman," which is interesting because it is then a case of what we might call abbreviated eponymy.
This type of eponymy is rare in economics, though quite common in other fields ("watt" and "volt" being prime examples).
Finally, although tobit is of course a play on probit and logit, two related (and noneponymous) concepts, it might also be a case of still another type of eponymy, rare in economics but common in other fields and in everyday language: fictional eponyms (as in "Oedipus complex," "Pandora's box," and so forth).
Review of Obstetric and Gynecologic Milestones: Essays in Eponymy by Harold Speert.
Stephen) Stigler's Law of Eponymy (an interesting case of autoeponymy) is at least partly based on an observation made by his father: "If we should ever encounter a case where a theory is named for the correct man, it will be noted" (G.
Whether we attribute eponymy to the style (of life or writing) or we treat it as a rhetorical figure or grammatically, we must pay attention to it in the anthropological register.
For the purposes of our study we will have to unify first the scientific language of linguists and bring it to the meaning of eponymy and paronomasia from the area of classical rhetoric in order to use the semantic and semasiology research in literature.
Enlarging the cultural perspective, eponymy includes also the representative names in a certain context, the characters who imprint their names in the activities they undertake ("the eponym archon", etc.