eponym


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eponym

 [ep´o-nim]
a name or phrase formed from or including a person's name, such as Hodgkin's disease, Cowper's glands, or Schick test. adj., adj eponym´ic, epon´ymous.

ep·o·nym

(ep'ō-nim),
The name of a disease, structure, operation, or procedure, usually derived from the name of the person who discovered or described it first.
[G. epōnymos, named after]

eponym

[ep′ənim]
Etymology: Gk, epi, above, onyma, name
a name for a disease, organ, procedure, or body function that is derived from the name of a person, usually a physician or scientist who first identified the condition or devised the object bearing the name. Examples include fallopian tube, Parkinson's disease, and Billing's method.

eponym

Medtalk A syndrome, lesion, surgical procedure or clinical sign that bears the name of the author who first described the entity, or less commonly, the name of the index Pt(s) in whom the lesion was first described

ep·o·nym

(ep'ŏ-nim)
The name of a disease, structure, operation, or procedure, usually derived from the name of the person who first discovered or described it.
Synonym(s): eponymic (2) .
[G. epōnymos, named after]

eponym

A name of a disease, syndrome, anatomical part, surgical instrument, etc derived from the name of the person who discovered, invented or first successfully promulgated it.

eponym

a name or phrase formed from or including a person's name, e.g. Theiler's disease, Cowper's gland, Aschheim-Zondek test.
References in periodicals archive ?
Eponyms, metonymy, euphemism, symbolism, and synonyms are all devices with which the author renames a referent.
Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy was described by Rosai and Dorfman in 19691 and, therefore, received the eponym Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD).
The British Empire" Hassan reminds us, "expanded under the rule of a mighty woman, Queen Victoria, the eponym of the Age of Empire whose name denotes '"victory" over those she subdues" (93).
com contributes to save the traditional tournament and the location Hamburger Rothenbaum by its commitment as eponym of the International German Open and I am looking forward to a long term relationship.
Nkomo claimed the title of "Father of the Nation": Mugabe is the son who laughed at his father, humiliated him, and drove him out of the house of stones, the eponym of Zimbabwe.
What a pity that Perec should have taken the trouble to give us a groundless philological detail and yet not have felt it necessary to tell us more about the venerable and remote eponym of his family
In 1961 G Ricklefs created the eponym of Uhthoff for the transient deterioration of symptoms or the new appearance of symptoms with increasing body temperature in patients with demyelinating diseases.
Incidentally, the current eponym 'Indian childhood cirrhosis', was actually introduced in 1957 by Jelliffe, et al (7) and it acquired long lease subsequently following Achar et al (8).
Widely known by its eponym Graves' disease, diffuse hyperplasia of the thyroid gland is an autoimmune condition in which excess thyroid hormone production is unchecked by the normal feedback loop between the thyroid and the pituitary gland.
The first eponym refers to Aaron Wildavsky (1930-1993) a political scientist who taught in the University of California and was famous for his work on risk.
Reference to ducal retention of Luca Pitti's palazzo and eponym to shore up Cosimo's "republican" virtu civile is, however, debatable.
As Eduardo Galeano recounts in Century of the Wind, when asked by journalists in Managua who assassinated Somoza, Sandinista comandante Tomas Borge responded to the mystery with the title of a seventeenth-century play by Spanish playwright Lope de Vega, eponym for a village that took collective responsibility for killing its own tyrant: "Fuenteovejuna," they replied when asked who killed him.