episome

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Related to episomes: Plasmids

episome

 [ep´ĭ-sōm″]
in bacterial genetics, any accessory extrachromosomal replicating genetic element that can exist either autonomously or integrated with the chromosome.

ep·i·some

(ep'i-sōm),
An extrachromosomal element (plasmid) that may either integrate into the bacterial chromosome of the host or replicate and function stably when physically separated from the chromosome.
[epi- + G. sōma, body (chromosome)]

episome

/ep·i·some/ (-sōm) in bacterial genetics, any accessory extrachromosomal replicating genetic element that can exist either autonomously or integrated with the chromosome.

episome

(ĕp′ĭ-sōm′)
n.
A segment of DNA in certain cells, especially bacterial cells, that can exist either autonomously in the cytoplasm or as part of a chromosome.

ep′i·so′mal adj.
ep·i·so′mal·ly adv.

episome

[ep′isōm]
Etymology: Gk, epi + soma, body
an extrachromosomal replicating unit that exists autonomously or functions with a chromosome. See also colicinogen, conjugon, F factor, plasmid, R factor.

ep·i·some

(ep'i-sōm)
An extrachromosomal element (plasmid) that may either integrate into the bacterial chromosome of the host or replicate and function stably when physically separated from the chromosome.
[epi- + G. sōma, body (chromosome)]

episome

a circular DNA molecule found in bacterial cells that can exist independently in the cell or can become integrated into the main CHROMOSOME. In recent times, episomes have been added to a general group of extrachromosomal factors called PLASMIDS.

episome

any accessory extrachromosomal replicating genetic element that can exist either autonomously or integrated with the chromosome. See also plasmid.
References in periodicals archive ?
The viral genome is maintained in these cells as a stable episome at low copy number, and it is these infected cells that form the reservoir for the development of a productive wart (9).
Whenever an infected cell divides, the episome makes a copy of itself, and each daughter cell receives one.
Since all episomes are generated by amplification of a single initial circle in the infected cells, analysis of the fused terminal fragments may indicate monoclonality, oligoclonality, or polyclonality of EBV-carrying cell populations.