episome

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Related to episomes: Plasmids

episome

 [ep´ĭ-sōm″]
in bacterial genetics, any accessory extrachromosomal replicating genetic element that can exist either autonomously or integrated with the chromosome.

ep·i·some

(ep'i-sōm),
An extrachromosomal element (plasmid) that may either integrate into the bacterial chromosome of the host or replicate and function stably when physically separated from the chromosome.
[epi- + G. sōma, body (chromosome)]

episome

/ep·i·some/ (-sōm) in bacterial genetics, any accessory extrachromosomal replicating genetic element that can exist either autonomously or integrated with the chromosome.

episome

(ĕp′ĭ-sōm′)
n.
A segment of DNA in certain cells, especially bacterial cells, that can exist either autonomously in the cytoplasm or as part of a chromosome.

ep′i·so′mal adj.
ep·i·so′mal·ly adv.

episome

[ep′isōm]
Etymology: Gk, epi + soma, body
an extrachromosomal replicating unit that exists autonomously or functions with a chromosome. See also colicinogen, conjugon, F factor, plasmid, R factor.

ep·i·some

(ep'i-sōm)
An extrachromosomal element (plasmid) that may either integrate into the bacterial chromosome of the host or replicate and function stably when physically separated from the chromosome.
[epi- + G. sōma, body (chromosome)]

episome

a circular DNA molecule found in bacterial cells that can exist independently in the cell or can become integrated into the main CHROMOSOME. In recent times, episomes have been added to a general group of extrachromosomal factors called PLASMIDS.

episome

any accessory extrachromosomal replicating genetic element that can exist either autonomously or integrated with the chromosome. See also plasmid.
References in periodicals archive ?
When bound to one region, EBNA1 helps initiate replication of the viral episome and the dispersal of the two copies into the daughter cells.
15] Somewhat suggestively, linearization of the circular viral episomes prior to integration invariably preserves the E6 and E7 genes, but disrupts the regulatory viral E2 gene.
In addition, the early and utterly consistent presence of monoclonal EBV episomes in nasopharyngeal carcinoma worldwide suggests a crucial role for the virus in that neoplasm.