episodic hypertension


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episodic hypertension

hypertension manifest intermittently, triggered by anxiety or emotional factors.

ep·i·so·dic hy·per·ten·sion

(ep'i-sod'ik hī'pĕr-ten'shŭn)
Hypertension manifested intermittently, triggered by anxiety or emotional factors.
Synonym(s): paroxysmal hypertension.

ep·i·so·dic hy·per·ten·sion

(ep'i-sod'ik hī'pĕr-ten'shŭn)
Hypertension that occurs intermittently, triggered by anxiety or emotional factors.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Patients with chemical sensitivity can develop a variety of symptoms due to inflammation that accompanies neural sensitization: sinus, ear and/or throat pain; congestion; coughing, wheezing, and/or shortness of breath; migraines, easy bruising; episodic hypertension with increased blood pressure (when exposed to trigger chemicals); angina with increased anginal pain (when exposed to triggers); irritable bowel; nausea; acid-reflux-like symptoms; diarrhea and abdominal discomfort, burning and/or irritation of the urethra, vulva, seminal vesicles, and other urinary lining tissue; burning/ irritated eyes; skin rash and/or burning sensation.
But variability and episodic hypertension is very common and matters much more than mean blood pressure in some patients.
Both stable and episodic hypertension can lead not only to strokes, but to heart attacks, peripheral artery disease, and congestive heart failure.
First, determine whether or not you have either stable or episodic hypertension.
A 33-year-old gravida-5, para-3 woman at 36 weeks gestation presented to a large peripheral hospital with a severe headache and associated episodic hypertension.
Presenting features include episodic hypertension, headaches, anxiety, palpitations and tachycardia.
Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is often utilized in the healthcare setting for a multitude of indications including the evaluation of episodic hypertension.
In June 2000, Spacelabs Medical requested that ABPM be approved for coverage for five indications: white coat hypertension, apparent resistance to antihypertensive drugs, hypotensive symptoms with antihypertensive medications, episodic hypertension, as well as autonomic dysfunction.
Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is most clinically helpful and most commonly used in patients with suspected `white coat hypertension,' but is also helpful in patients with apparent drug resistance, hypotensive symptoms with anti-hypertensive medications, episodic hypertension and autonomic dysfunction.
1-6) The most recent Joint National Committee report outlines clinical situations where ABPM may be helpful, including suspected white-coat hypertension, drug resistance, hypotensive symptoms, episodic hypertension, and autonomic dysfunction.